Evaluation of DVR Capability Enhancement -Zero Active Power Tracking Technique

ABSTRACT:  

This paper presents a utilization technique for enhancing the capabilities of dynamic voltage restorers (DVRs). This study aims to enhance the abilities of DVRs to maintain acceptable voltages and last longer during compensation. Both the magnitude and phase displacement angle of the synthesized DVR voltage are precisely adjusted to achieve lower power utilization. The real and reactive powers are calculated in real time in the tracking loop to achieve better conditions. This technique results in less energy being taken out of the DC-link capacitor, resulting in smaller size requirements. The results from both the simulation and experimental tests illustrate that the proposed technique clearly achieved superior performance. The DVR’s active action period was considerably longer, with nearly 5 times the energy left in the DC-link capacitor for further compensation compared to the traditional technique. This technical merit demonstrates that DVRs could cover a wider range of voltage sags; the practicality of this idea for better utilization is better than that of existing installed DVRs.

KEYWORDS:

 

  1. DVR capability
  2. Energy optimized
  3. Energy source
  4. Series compensator
  5. Voltage stability

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1. Circuit diagram model for simulation using MatLab/Simulink.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. D-axis voltages at the system (VSd), DVR (VDVRd), and load (VLd). during in-phase compensation (simulation).

Fig. 3. Q-axis voltages at the system (VSq), DVR (VDVRq), and load (VLq) during in-phase compensation (simulation).

 

Fig. 4. The overall three-phase voltage signals during in-phase compensation (simulation).

Fig. 5. Real power at source (PS), the DVR (PDVR) and load (PL) during in-phase compensation (simulation).

 

Fig. 6. The DVR DC-side voltage (VDC) during in-phase compensation (simulation).

 

Fig. 7. D-axis voltages at the system(VSd), DVR (VDVRd), and load (VLd) during zero-real power tracking compensation (simulation).

Fig. 8. Q-axis voltages at the system (VSq), DVR (VDVRq), and load (VLq) during zero-real power tracking compensation (simulation)..

Fig. 9. The overall three-phase voltage signals during zero-real power tracking compensation (simulation).

Fig. 10. The DVR DC-side voltage (VDC) during zero-real power tracking compensation (simulation).

CONCLUSION:

 It is clear from both the simulation and experimental results illustrated in this paper that the proposed zero-real power tracking technique applied to DVR-based compensation can result in superior performance compared to the traditional in-phase technique. The experimental test results match those proposed using simulation, although some discrepancies due to the imperfect nature of the test circuit components were seen.

With the traditional in-phase technique, the compensation was performed and depended on the real power injected to the system. Then, more of the energy stored in the DC-link capacitor was utilized quickly, reaching its limitation within a shorter period. The compensation was eventually forced to stop before the entire voltage sag period was finished. When the compensation was conducted using the proposed technique, less energy was used for the converter basic switching process. The clear advantage in terms of the voltage level at the DC-link capacitor indicates that with the proposed technique, more energy remains in the DVR (67% to 14% in the traditional in-phase technique), which guarantees the correct compensating voltage will be provided for longer periods of compensation. With this technique, none (or less) of the real power will be transferred to the system, which provides more for the DVR to cover a wider range of voltage sags, adding more flexible adaptive control to the solution of sag voltage disturbances.

REFERENCES:

[1] M. Bollen, Understanding Power Quality Problems, Voltage Sags and Interruptions. New York: IEEE Press, 1999.

[2] J. Roldán-Pérez, A. García-Cerrada, J. L. Zamora-Macho, P. Roncero-Sánchez, and E. Acha, “Troubleshooting a digital repetitive controller for a versatile dynamic voltage restorer,” Int. J. Elect. Power Energy Syst., vol. 57, pp. 105–115, May 2014.

[3] P. Kanjiya, B. Singh, A. Chandra, and K. Al-Haddad, “SRF theory revisited to control self-supported dynamic voltage restorer (DVR) for unbalanced and nonlinear loads,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol. 49, no. 5, pp. 2330–2340, Sep. 2013.

[4] S. Naidu, and D. Fernandes, “Dynamic voltage restorer based on a four-leg voltage source converter,” IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution, vol. 3, no. 5, pp. 437–447, May 2009.

[5] T. Jimichi, H. Fujita, and H. Akagi, “A dynamic voltage restorer equipped with a high-frequency isolated dc-dc converter,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 169– 175, Jan. 2011.

 

Digital Simulation of the Generalized Unified Power Flow Controller System with 60-Pulse GTO-Based Voltage Source Converter

 

ABSTRACT:

The Generalized Unified Power Flow Controller (GUPFC) is a Voltage Source Converter (VSC) based Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) controller for shunt and series compensation among the multiline transmission systems of a substation. The paper proposes a full model comprising of 60-pulse Gate Turn-Off thyristor VSC that is constructed becomes the GUPFC in digital simulation system and investigates the dynamic operation of control scheme for shunt and two series VSC for active and reactive power compensation and voltage stabilization of the electric grid network. The complete digital simulation of the shunt VSC operating as a Static Synchronous Compensator (STATCOM) controlling voltage at bus and two series VSC operating as a Static Synchronous Series Capacitor (SSSC) controlling injected voltage, while keeping injected voltage in quadrature with current within the power system is performed in the MATLAB/Simulink environment using the Power System Block set (PSB). The GUPFC, control system scheme and the electric grid network are modeled by specific electric blocks from the power system block set. The controllers for the shunt VSC and two series VSCs are presented in this paper based on the decoupled current control strategy. The performance of GUPFC scheme connected to the 500-kV grid is evaluated. The proposed GUPFC controller scheme is fully validated by digital simulation.

KEYWORDS:

60-Pulse GTO Thyristor Model VSC, UPFC, GUPFC,Active and Reactive Compensation, Voltage Stability

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

UPFC with 60-Pulse GTO-Based Voltage Source Converter

Figure 1. Three-bus system with the GUPFC at bus B5 and B2

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

2

 Figure 2. Sixty-pulse VSC output voltage

3

Figure 3. Simulated results of the GUPFC .shunt converter operation for DC voltage with Qref = 0.3pu; 0.5 pu

4

Figure 4. Simulated results of the GUPFC series converter operation Pref=8.7pu; 10pu, Qref=-0.6pu; 0.7pu

5

Figure 5. Simulated results of the GUPFC series converter operation Pref=7.7pu; 9.0pu, Qref=-0.5pu; 0.9pu

6

Figure 6. Digital simulation results for the decoupled current controller schemes for the shunt VSC in a weak power system

 CONCLUSION:

The paper presents and proposes a novel full 60-pulse GTO voltage source converter that it constructed becomes GUPFC FACTS devices. It comprises the full 60-pulse VSC-cascade models connected to the grid network through the coupling transformer. These full descriptive digital models are validated for voltage stabilization, active and reactive compensation and dynamically power flow control using three decoupled current control strategies. The control strategies implement decoupled current control switching technique to ensure accountability, minimum oscillatory behavior, minimum inherent phase locked loop time delay as well as system instability reduced impact due to a weak interconnected ac system and ensures full dynamic regulation of the bus voltage (VB), the series voltage injected and the dc link voltage Vdc. The 60-pulse VSC generates less harmonic distortion and reduces power quality problems in comparison to other converters such as (6,12,24 and 36) pulse. In the synchronous reference frame, a complete model of a GUPFC has been presented and control circuits for the shunt and two series converters have been described. The simulated results presented confirm that the performance of the proposed GUPFC is satisfactory for active and reactive power flow control and independent shunt reactive compensation.

 REFERENCES:

[1] K. K. Sen, “SSSC-static synchronous series compensator. Theory, modeling and application”, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 13, No. 1, pp. 241-246, January 1998.

[2] B. Fardanesh, B. Shperling, E. Uzunovic, and S. Zelingher, “Multi-Converter FACTS Devices: The Generalized Unified Power Flow Controller (GUPFC),” in IEEE 2000 PES Summer Meeting, Seattle, USA, July 2000.

[3] N. G. Hingorani and L. Gyugyi, “Understanding FACTS, Concepts and Technology of Flexible AC Transmission Systems. Pscataway, NJ: IEEE Press. 2000.

[4] X. P. Zang, “Advanced Modeling of the Multicontrol Func-tional Static Synchronous Series Compensator (SSSC) in Newton Power Flow” , IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, Vol. 20, No. 4, pp. 1410-1416, November 2005,

[5] A. H. Norouzi and A. M. Sharaf, Two Control Schemes to Enhance the Dynamic Performance of the Statcom and Sssc”, IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 435-442, January 2005.

 

 

Adaptive PI Control of STATCOM for Voltage Regulation

ABSTRACT:

STATCOM can provide fast and efficient reactive power support to maintain power system voltage stability. In the literature, various STATCOM control methods have been discussed including many applications of proportional-integral (PI) controllers. However, these previous works obtain the PI gains via a trial-and-error approach or extensive studies with a tradeoff of performance and applicability. Hence, control parameters for the optimal performance at a given operating point may not be effective at a different operating point. This paper proposes a new control model based on adaptive PI control, which can self-adjust the control gains during a disturbance such that the performance always matches a desired response, regardless of the change of operating condition. Since the adjustment is autonomous, this gives the plug-and-play capability for STATCOM operation. In the simulation test, the adaptive PI control shows consistent excellence under various operating conditions, such as different initial control gains, different load levels, change of transmission network, consecutive disturbances, and a severe disturbance. In contrast, the conventional STATCOM control with tuned, fixed PI gains usually perform fine in the original system, but may not perform as efficient as the proposed control method when there is a change of system conditions.

KEYWORDS:
1. Adaptive control
2. Plug and play
3. Proportional-integral (PI) control
4. Reactive power compensation
5. STATCOM
6. Voltage stability.

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:
image001
Figure 1 Studied system

image004
Fig.2 Results of (a) voltages and (b) output reactive power using the same network and loads as in the original system.
image006
Fig.3 Results of using the same network and loads as in the original system.
image008
Fig. 4. Results of (a) voltages and (b) output reactive power with changed PI control gains
image010
Fig. 5. Results of (a) voltages and (b) output reactive power with a change of load
image012
Fig. 6. Results of with changed PI control gains.
image014
Fig. 7. Results of α with a change of load.
image008
Fig. 8. Results of α(a) voltages and (b) output reactive power with a change of transmission network.
image018
Fig. 9. Results of α with a change of transmission network.
image020
Fig. 10. Results of α (a) voltages and (b) output reactive power with two consecutive disturbances.
image022
Fig. 11. Results of α with two consecutive disturbances.

CONCLUSION:
In the literature, various STATCOM control methods have been discussed including many applications of PI controllers. However, these previous works obtain the PI gains via a trialand- error approach or extensive studies with a tradeoff of performance and applicability. Hence, control parameters for the optimal performance at a given operating point may not always be effective at a different operating point. To address the challenge, this paper proposes a new control model based on adaptive PI control, which can self-adjust the control gains dynamically during disturbances so that the performance always matches a desired response, regardless of the change of operating condition. Since the adjustment is autonomous, this gives the “plug-and-play” capability for STATCOM operation.
In the simulation study, the proposed adaptive PI control for STATCOMis compared with the conventional STATCOM control with pretuned fixed PI gains to verify the advantages of the proposed method. The results show that the adaptive PI control gives consistently excellent performance under various operating conditions, such as different initial control gains, different load levels, change of the transmission network, consecutive disturbances, and a severe disturbance. In contrast, the conventional STATCOM control with fixed PI gains has acceptable performance in the original system, but may not perform as efficient as the proposed control method when there is a change of system conditions.
Future work may lie in the investigation of multiple STATCOMs since the interaction among different STATCOMs may affect each other. Also, the extension to other power system control problems can be explored.

REFERENCES:
[1] F. Li, J. D. Kueck, D. T. Rizy, and T. King, “A preliminary analysis of the economics of using distributed energy as a source of reactive power supply,” Oak Ridge, TN, USA, First Quart. Rep. Fiscal Year, Apr. 2006, Oak Ridge Nat. Lab.
[2] A. Jain, K. Joshi, A. Behal, and N. Mohan, “Voltage regulation with STATCOMs:Modeling, control and results,” IEEE Trans. Power Del., vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 726–735, Apr. 2006.
[3] D. Soto and R. Pena, “Nonlinear control strategies for cascaded multilevel STATCOMs,” IEEE Trans. Power Del., vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 1919–1927, Oct. 2004.
[4] F. Liu, S. Mei, Q. Lu, Y. Ni, F. F. Wu, and A. Yokoyama, “The nonlinear internal control of STATCOM: Theory and application,” Int. J. Elect. Power Energy Syst., vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 421–430, 2003.
[5] C. Hochgraf and R. H. Lasseter, “STATCOM controls for operation with unbalanced voltage,” IEEE Trans. Power Del., vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 538–544, Apr. 1998.