An Improved Control Algorithm of Shunt Active Filter for Voltage Regulation, Harmonic Elimination, Power-Factor Correction, and Balancing of Nonlinear Loads

ABSTRACT:  

This paper control with an implementation of a new manipulate algorithm for a three-phase shunt active filter to behavior load terminal voltage, get rid of harmonics, correct grant power-factor, and balance the nonlinear unbalanced loads.. A three-phase insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) based current controlled voltage source inverter (CC-VSI) with a dc bus capacitor is used as an active filter (AF). The control algorithm of the AF uses two closed loop PI controllers.

The dc bus voltage of the AF and three-phase supply voltages are used as feed back signals in the PI controllers. The control algorithm of the AF provides three-phase reference supply currents. A carrier wave pulse width modulation (PWM) current controller is working over the reference and notice supply currents to generate gating pulses of IGBT’s of the AF. Test results are given and discussed to display the voltage regulation, harmonic elimination, power-factor correction and load balancing capabilities of the AF system.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Active filter
  2. Harmonic compensation
  3. Load balancing
  4. Power-factor correction
  5. Voltage regulation

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:


Fig. 1. Fundamental building block of the active filter.

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. Performance of the AF system under switch IN and steady state conditions with a three-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 3. Steady state response of the AF for voltage rgulation and harmonic elimination with a three-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 4. Steady state response of the AF for voltage regulation, harmonic elimination, and load balancing with a single-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 5. Switch IN response of the AF for voltage regulation, harmonic elimination with a three-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 6. Switch IN response of the AF for voltage regulation, harmonic elimination and load balancing with a single-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 7. Dynamic response of the AF for voltage regulation, harmonic elimination, and load balancing under the load change from three-phase to single-phase.

Fig. 8. Dynamic response of the AF for voltage regulation, harmonic elimination, and load balancing under the load change from single-phase to three-phase.

Fig. 9. Steady state response of the AF for power-factor correction, harmonic elimination with a three-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 10. Steady state response of the AF for power-factor correction, harmonic elimination, and load balancing with a single-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 11. Switch IN response of the AF for power-factor correction and harmonic elimination with a three-phase nonlinear load.

Fig. 12. Switch IN response of the AF for power-factor correction, harmonic elimination, and load balancing with a single-phase nonlinear load.

 CONCLUSION:

 An improved control algorithm of the AF system has been start on a DSP system for voltage regulation/power-factor correction, harmonic elimination and load balancing of nonlinear loads. Dynamic and steady state work of the AF system have been noticed under different operating conditions of the load. The work of the AF system has been found to be excellent. The AF system has been found able of improving the power quality, voltage profile, power-factor correction, harmonic elimination and balancing the nonlinear loads.

The proposed control algorithm of the AF has an basic estate to provide a self-supporting dc bus and want less number of current sensors resulting in an over all cost cut. It has been found that for voltage regulation and power-factor correction to unity are two different things and can not be produce together.

However, a proper weight-age to in-phase and quadrature components of the supply current can provide a logically good level of work and voltage at PCC can be controlled with a leading power-factor near to unity. It has been found that the AF system reduces harmonics in the voltage at PCC and the supply currents well below the mark of 5% stated in IEEE-519 standard.

REFERENCES:

[1] L. Gyugyi and E. C. Strycula, “Active AC power filters,” in Proc.IEEE-IAS Annu. Meeting Record, 1976, pp. 529–535.

[2] T. J. E. Miller, Reactive Power Control in Electric Systems. Toronto,Ont., Canada: Wiley, 1982.

[3] J. F. Tremayne, “Impedance and phase balancing of main-frequency induction furnaces,” Proc. Inst. Elect. Eng. B, pt. B, vol. 130, no. 3, pp. 161–170, May 1983.

[4] H. Akagi, Y. Kanazawa, and A. Nabae, “Instantaneous reactive power compensators comprising switching devices without energy storage components,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Applicat., vol. IA-20, pp. 625–630, May/June 1984.

[5] T. A. Kneschki, “Control of utility system unbalance caused by single-phase electric traction,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Applicat., vol. IA-21, pp. 1559–1570, Nov./Dec. 1985.

The Application of Electric Spring in Grid-Connected Photovoltaic System

ABSTRACT:  

The characteristics of distributed photovoltaic system power generation system is intermittent and instability. Under the weak grid conditions, when the active power of the PV system injected into the grid is fluctuant, the voltage of supply feeder will increase or decrease, thus affecting the normal use of sensitive load. The electric spring can transfer the energy injected into the supply feeder to the wide-voltage load, which is in series with the ES, to ensure the voltage stability of the sensitive load in the system.

In this paper, a grid-connected photovoltaic simulation model with electric spring is built in Matlab / simulink. The voltage waveforms on the ES and sensitive load is obtained under the condition of changing the active power injected into the supply feeder by the grid-connected photovoltaic system. Thought the analysis of the waveforms, we can find that the Electric spring is a kind of effective method to solve the voltage fluctuation of the supply feeder in the grid-connected PV system.

KEYWORDS:
  1. Electric spring
  2. Grid-Connected Photovoltaic System
  3. Voltage Regulation
  4. Photovoltaic Consumption

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Figure 1. The photovoltaic system model with Electric spring

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Figure 2. The effective value of line voltage when the active power of PV system decreases

Figure 3. The line voltage when the active power of PV system increases (with ES)

 CONCLUSION:

 This paper applies the electric spring to the PV system to solve the problem that the bus voltage fluctuates due to the power fluctuation during the PV power injected into the bus. By building a simulation model in Matlab /Simulink, it is proved that the voltage on the bus can be effectively stabilized after adding the electric spring in the grid-connected photovoltaic system. When the active power of the PV fluctuates, the electric spring can transfer the voltage fluctuation on the bus to the wide-voltage load, in order to ensure that the bus voltage stability in the vicinity of the given value. Therefore, this is an effective method to solve the fluctuation of the bus voltage in PV grid connected system.

REFERENCES:
  1. Hui S Y R, Lee C K, Wu F. Electric springs—A new smart grid technology[J]. IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, 2012, 3(3): 1552-1561.
  2. F. Kienzle, P. Ahein, and G. Andersson, “Valuing investments in multi-energy conversion, storage, and demand-Side management systems under uncertainty,” IEEE Trans Sustain. Energy, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 194–202,Apr. 2011.
  3. C. K. Lee and S. Y. R. Hui, “Input voltage control bidirectional power converters,” US patent application, US2013/0322139, May 31, 2013.
  4. CHEN Xu, ZHANG Yongjun, HUANG Xiangmin. Review of Reactive Power and Voltage Control Method in the Background of Active Distribution Network[J]. Automation of Electric Power Systems,2016,40(01):143-
  5. Lee S C, Kim S J, Kim S H. Demand side management with air conditioner loads based on the queuing system model[J]. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, 2010, 26 (2): 661-668.

Design of External Inductor for Improving Performance of Voltage Controlled DSTATCOM

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, 2015

ABSTRACT: A distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM) is used for load voltage regulation and its performance mainly depends upon the feeder impedance and its nature (resistive, inductive, stiff, non-stiff). However, a study for analyzing voltage regulation performance of DSTATCOM depending upon network parameters is not well defined. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive study of design, operation, and flexible control of a DSTATCOM operating in voltage control mode. A detailed analysis of the voltage regulation capability of DSTATCOM under various feeder impedances is presented. Then, a benchmark design procedure to compute the value of external inductor is presented. A dynamic reference load voltage generation scheme is also developed which allows DSTATCOM to compensate load reactive power during normal operation, in addition to providing voltage support during disturbances. Simulation and experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM)
  2. Current control
  3. Voltage control
  4. Power factor
  5. Power quality

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

EQUIVALENT CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

 Fig. 1. Three phase equivalent circuit of DSTATCOM topology in distribution system.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. Voltage regulation performance of conventional DSTATCOM with resistive feeder. (a) PCC voltages. (b) Load Voltages. (c) Source currents. (d) Filter currents. (e) Load currents.

Fig. 3. Simulation results. (a) During normal operation (i)-(v). (b) During voltage sag (vi)-(x). (c) During voltage swell (xi)-(xv).

CONCLUSION:

This paper has presented design, operation, and control of a DSTATCOM operating in voltage control mode (VCM). After providing a detailed exploration of voltage regulation capability of DSTATCOM under various feeder scenarios, a benchmark design procedure for selecting suitable value of external inductor is proposed. An algorithm is formulated for dynamic reference load voltage magnitude generation. The DSTATCOM has improved voltage regulation capability with a reduced current rating VSI, reduced losses in the VSI and feeder. Also, dynamic reference load voltage generation scheme allows DSTATCOM to set different constant reference voltage during voltage disturbances. Simulation and experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed solution. The external inductor is a very simple and cheap solution for improving the voltage regulation, however it remains connected throughout the operation and continuous voltage drop across it occurs. The future work includes operation of this fixed inductor as a controlled reactor so that its effect can be minimized by varying its inductance.

REFERENCES:

[1] M. H. Bollen, Understanding power quality problems. vol. 3, IEEE press New York, 2000.

[2] S. Ostroznik, P. Bajec, and P. Zajec, “A study of a hybrid filter,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 935–942, Mar. 2010.

[3] C. Kumar and M. Mishra, “A voltage-controlled DSTATCOM for power quality improvement,” IEEE Trans. Power Del., vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 1499– 1507, June 2014.

[4] Q. Liu, L. Peng, Y. Kang, S. Tang, D. Wu, and Y. Qi, “A novel design and optimization method of an LCL filter for a shunt active power filter,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 61, no. 8, pp. 4000–4010, Aug. 2014.

[5] T. Aziz, M. Hossain, T. Saha, and N. Mithulananthan, “VAR planning with tuning of STATCOM in a DG integrated industrial system,” IEEE Trans. Power Del., vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 875–885, Apr. 2013.

A Voltage Regulator for Power Quality Improvement in Low-Voltage Distribution Grids

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents a voltage-controlled DSTATCOM-based voltage regulator for low voltage distribution grids. The voltage regulator is designed to temporarily meet the grid code, postponing unplanned investments while a definitive solution could be planned to solve regulation issues. The power stage is composed of a three-phase four-wire Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) and a second order low-pass filter. The control strategy has three output voltage loops with active damping and two dc bus voltage loops. In addition, two loops are included to the proposed control strategy: the concept of Minimum Power Point Tracking (mPPT) and the frequency loop. The mPPT allows the voltage regulator to operate at the Minimum Power Point (mPP), avoiding the circulation of unnecessary reactive compensation. The frequency loop allows the voltage regulator to be independent of the grid voltage information, especially the grid angle, using only the information available at the Point of Common Coupling (PCC). Experimental results show the regulation capacity, the features of the mPPT algorithm for linear and nonlinear loads and the frequency stability.

KEYWORDS:

  1. DSTATCOM, Frequency Compensation
  2. Minimum Power Point Tracker
  3. Power Quality
  4. Static VAR Compensators
  5. Voltage Control
  6. Voltage Regulation

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Low voltage distribution grid under analysis with the voltage regulator

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. Dc bus voltages during the DSTATCOM initialization

Fig. 3. PCC voltages without compensation for linear loads

Fig. 4. PCC voltages with compensation for linear loads

Fig. 5. Voltage regulator currents for linear loads

Fig. 6. Grid, load and voltage regulator currents for linear loads

Fig. 7. PCC voltages without compensation for nonlinear loads

Fig. 8. PCC voltages with compensation for nonlinear loads

Fig. 9. Voltage regulator currents for nonlinear loads

Fig. 10. Grid, load and voltage regulator currents for nonlinear loads

Fig. 11. PCC rms value with linear loads

Fig. 12. Processed apparent power with linear loads

Fig. 13. Voltage regulator currents with mPPT enabled for linear loads

Fig. 14. PCC rms value with nonlinear loads

Fig. 15. Processed apparent power with nonlinear loads

Fig. 16. Voltage regulator currents with mPPT enabled for nonlinear loads

Fig. 17. Total dc bus voltage, PCC voltage, grid voltage and voltage regulator current waveforms of a-phase with mPPT enabled with grid swell

Fig. 18. (a) Total dc bus voltage, PCC voltage, grid voltage and voltage regulator current waveforms of a-phase and (b) detail of total dc bus voltage performance with mPPT enabled with grid sag

CONCLUSION:

This paper presents a three phase DSTATCOM as a voltage regulator and its control strategy, composed of the conventional loops, output voltage and dc bus regulation loops, including the voltage amplitude and the frequency loops. Experimental results demonstrate the voltage regulation capability, supplying three balanced voltages at the PCC, even under nonlinear loads.

The proposed amplitude loop was able to reduce the voltage regulator processed apparent power about 51 % with nonlinear load and even more with linear load (80%). The mPPT algorithm tracked the minimum power point within the allowable voltage range when reactive power compensation is not necessary. With grid voltage sag and swell, the amplitude loop meets the grid code. The mPPT can also be implemented in current-controlled DSTATCOMs, achieving similar results. The frequency loop kept the compensation angle within the analog limits, increasing the autonomy of the voltage regulator, and the dc bus voltage regulated at nominal value, thus minimizing the dc bus voltage steady state error. Simultaneous operation of the mPPT and the frequency loop was verified. The proposed voltage regulator is a shunt connected solution, which is tied to low voltage distribution grids without any power interruption to the loads, without any grid voltage and impedance information, and provides balanced and low-THD voltages to the customers.

REFERENCES:

[1] D. O. Koval and C. Carter, “Power quality characteristics of computer loads,” IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 613- 621, May/June1997.

[2] Abraham I. Pressman, Keith Billings and Taylor Morey, “Switching Power Supply Design,” 3rd ed., McGraw Hill, New York, 2009.

[3] B. Singh, B.N. Singh, A. Chandra, K. Al-Haddad, A. Pandey and D.P. Kothari, “A review of single-phase improved power quality AC-DC converters” IEEE Trans. on Industrial Electronics, vol.50, no.5, pp.962- 981, Oct. 2003.

[4] K. Mino, H. Matsumoto, Y. Nemoto, S. Fujita, D. Kawasaki, Ryuji Yamada, and N. Tawada, “A front-end converter with high reliability and high efficiency,” in IEEE Conf. on Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition (ECCE),2010, pp. 3216-3223.

[5] Jih-Sheng Lai, D. Hurst and T. Key, Switch-mode supply power factor improvement via harmonic elimination methods,” in 6th Annual IEEE Proc. on Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, APEC’91, 1991, pp. 415-422.

 

 

Droop Control of Distributed Electric Springs for Stabilizing Future Power Grid

ABSTRACT:

This paper describes the droop control method for parallel operation of distributed electric springs for stabilizing ac power grid. It provides a methodology that has the potential of allowing reactive power controllers to work in different locations of the distribution lines of an ac power supply and for these reactive power controllers to support and stabilize the ac mains voltage levels at their respective locations on the distribution lines. The control scheme allows these reactive power controllers to have automatically adjustable voltage references according to the mains voltage levels at the locations of the distribution network. The control method can be applied to reactive power controllers embedded in smart electric loads distributed across the power grid for stabilizing and supporting the ac power supply along the distribution network. The proposed distributed deployment of electric springs is envisaged to become an emerging technology potentially useful for stabilizing power grids with substantial penetration of distributed and intermittent renewable power sources or weakly regulated ac power grid.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Droop control
  2. Electric springs
  3. Smart gird
  4. Voltage regulation

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1. Single phase diagram of the experimental setup of the power grid and loads (with 3 distributed electric springs working as a group).

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. (a) Measured root-mean-square values of the mains voltage VS1,VS2 and VS3 (b) Measured root-mean-square values of the mains voltage VS1,VS2 and VS3 from 1800 to 1440 sec (ES activated without the proposed droop control) (c) Measured root-mean-square values of the mains voltage VS1,VS2 and VS3 from 1800 to 2160 sec (ES activated with the proposed droop control).

Fig. 3. Measured average value of reactive power generated by the 3 electric springs (Qa1 ,Qa2 and Qa3 ).

Fig. 4. Measured modulation indexes of the electric springs M1,M2 and M3 .

Fig. 5. Measured average value of the critical load power PR1,PR2 and PR3 .

Fig. 6. Measured root-mean-square values of the non-critical load voltage Vo1 ,Vo2 and Vo3 .

Fig. 7. Measured average value of the non-critical load power Po1,Po2 and Po3

.CONCLUSION:

A control scheme has been successfully developed and implemented for a group of electric springs. It enables individual electric springs to generate their mains voltage reference values according to their installation locations in the distribution lines and to work in co-operative manner, instead of fighting against one another, therefore allowing the electric springs to work in group to maximize their reactive power compensation effects for voltage regulation. The control method also leads to more evenly distribution of load power shedding among the non-critical loads. The attractive features of the control scheme have been successfully verified in an experimental smart grid setup.

With the droop control scheme,many electric springs of small VA ratings could be embedded into non-critical loads such as electric water heaters and refrigerators to form a new generation of smart loads that are adaptive to power grid with substantial penetration of renewable energy sources of distributed and intermittent nature. If many small electric springs are deployed in the power grid in a distributed manner, their collective voltage stabilizing efforts can be added together. Because the electric springs allow these smart loads to consume power following the varying profile of intermittent renewable energy sources, they have the potential to solve the stability problems arising from the intermittent nature of renewable energy sources and ensure that the load demand will follow power generation, which is the new control paradigm for future smart grid. Since the electric appliances embedded with the electric springs can share load shedding automatically, this approach should be more consumer-friendly when compared with the on-off control of electric appliances. For example, shutting down refrigerators is intrusive and inconvenient to the consumers (and may involve consumers’ rights issues) and requires some forms of central control. Allowing many smart refrigerators to shed some load without being noticed and central control is more consumer- friendly.

The individual operations of the electric springs have previously been evaluated. The successful implementation of the droop control for 3 electric springs working as a group in a small distributed network in this study is a just a step forward to confirm that multiple electric springs can work together without ICT technology. The collective effects of electric springs and their capacity are new topics that deserve further investigations. Extensive simulation studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of many such electric springs working together in a large-scale power system model.

REFERENCES:

[1] P. P. Varaiya, F. F. Wu, and J. W. Bialek, “Smart operation of smart grid: Risk-limiting dispatch,” Proc. IEEE, vol. 99, no. 1, pp. 40–57, 2011.

[2] D. Westermann and A. John, “Demand matching wind power generation with wide-area measurement and demand-side management,” IEEE Trans. Energy Conversion, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 145–149, 2007.

[3] P. Palensky and D. Dietrich, “Demand side management: Demand response, intelligent energy systems, and smart loads,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Informatics, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 381–388, 2011.

[4] A. Mohsenian-Rad, V. W. S. Wong, J. Jatskevich, R. Schober, and A. Leon-Garcia, “Autonomous demand-side management based on gametheoretic energy consumption scheduling for the future smart grid,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 320–331, 2010.

[5] M. Parvania and M. Fotuhi-Firuzabad, “Demand response scheduling by stochastic SCUC,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 89–98,2010.

A Voltage Regulator for Power Quality Improvement in Low-Voltage Distribution Grids

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents a voltage-controlled DSTATCOM-based voltage regulator for low voltage distribution grids. The voltage regulator is designed to temporarily meet the grid code, postponing unplanned investments while a definitive solution could be planned to solve regulation issues. The power stage is composed of a three-phase four-wire Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) and a second order low-pass filter. The control strategy has three output voltage loops with active damping and two dc bus voltage loops. In addition, two loops are included to the proposed control strategy: the concept of Minimum Power Point Tracking (mPPT) and the frequency loop. The mPPT allows the voltage regulator to operate at the Minimum Power Point (mPP), avoiding the circulation of unnecessary reactive compensation. The frequency loop allows the voltage regulator to be independent of the grid voltage information, especially the grid angle, using only the information available at the Point of Common Coupling (PCC). Experimental results show the regulation capacity, the features of the mPPT algorithm for linear and nonlinear loads and the frequency stability.

KEYWORDS:

  1. DSTATCOM
  2. Frequency compensation
  3. Minimum power point tracker
  4. Power quality
  5.  Static VAR compensators
  6. Voltage control
  7. Voltage regulation

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 BLOCK DIAGRAM:

 Fig. 1. Low voltage distribution grid under analysis with the voltage regulator

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Fig. 2. Dc bus voltages during the DSTATCOM initialization

 

Fig. 3. PCC voltages without compensation for linear loads

Fig. 4. PCC voltages with compensation for linear loads

Fig. 5. Voltage regulator currents for linear loads

Fig. 6. Grid, load and voltage regulator currents for linear loads

Fig. 7. PCC voltages without compensation for nonlinear loads

Fig. 8. PCC voltages with compensation for nonlinear loads

Fig. 9. Voltage regulator currents for nonlinear loads

Fig. 10. Grid, load and voltage regulator currents for nonlinear loads

Fig. 11. PCC rms value with linear loads

Fig. 12. Processed apparent power with linear loads

Fig. 13. Voltage regulator currents with mPPT enabled for linear loads

Fig. 14. PCC rms value with nonlinear loads

Fig. 15. Processed apparent power with nonlinear loads

Fig. 16. Voltage regulator currents with mPPT enabled for nonlinear loads

Fig. 17. Total dc bus voltage, PCC voltage, grid voltage and voltage regulator current waveforms of a-phase with mPPT enabled with grid swell

Fig. 18. (a) Total dc bus voltage, PCC voltage, grid voltage and voltage regulator current waveforms of a-phase and (b) detail of total dc bus voltage performance with mPPT enabled with grid sag

CONCLUSION:

This paper presents a three phase DSTATCOM as a voltage regulator and its control strategy, composed of the conventional loops, output voltage and dc bus regulation loops, including the voltage amplitude and the frequency loops.

Experimental results demonstrate the voltage regulation capability, supplying three balanced voltages at the PCC, even under nonlinear loads.

The proposed amplitude loop was able to reduce the voltage regulator processed apparent power about 51 % with nonlinear load and even more with linear load (80%). The mPPT algorithm tracked the minimum power point within the allowable voltage range when reactive power compensation is not necessary. With grid voltage sag and swell, the amplitude loop meets the grid code. The mPPT can also be implemented in current-controlled DSTATCOMs, achieving similar results.

The frequency loop kept the compensation angle within the analog limits, increasing the autonomy of the voltage regulator, and the dc bus voltage regulated at nominal value, thus minimizing the dc bus voltage steady state error. Simultaneous operation of the mPPT and the frequency loop was verified.

The proposed voltage regulator is a shunt connected solution, which is tied to low voltage distribution grids without any power interruption to the loads, without any grid voltage and impedance information, and provides balanced and low-THD voltages to the customers.

REFERENCES:

[1] ANEEL National Electric Power Distribution System Procedures – PRODIST, Module 8: Energy Quality. Revision 07, 2014.

[2] M. Mishra, A. Ghosh and A. Joshi, “Operation of a DSTATCOM in voltage control mode,” IEEE Trans. Power Del., vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 258-264, Jan. 2003.

[3] G. Ledwich and A. Ghosh, “A flexible DSTATCOM operating in voltage or current control mode,” IEE Proc.-Gener., Transmiss. Distrib., vol. 149, n. 2, pp. 215-224, Mar. 2002.

[4] T. P. Enderle, G. da Silva, C. Fischer, R. C. Beltrame, L. Schuch, V. F. Montagner and C. Rech, “D-STATCOM applied to single-phase distribution networks: Modeling and control,” in Proc. IEEE Ind. Electron. Soc. Annu. Conf., Oct. 2012, pp. 321 – 326.

[5] C. Kumar and M. Mishra, “Energy conservation and power quality improvement with voltage controlled DSTATCOM,” in Proc. Annu. IEEE India Conf., Dec. 2013 pp. 1-6.

 

A Novel Power Factor Correction Technique/or a Boost Converter

ABSTRACT:

The paper evolves a mechanism for improving the input power factor of an AC-DC-DC change system. It involves the process of shaping the input current wave to phase align with the input supply through a process of error benefit. The methodology includes cohesive formulation to arrive at nearly unity power factor and enjoy the etiquettes of output voltage regulation.

PWM

The theory relieve to subscribe the benefits for the entire range of operating loads. It eliminates the use of passive components and fortifies the principles of pulse width modulation (PWM) for realizing the change in duty cycle. The MA TLAB based simulation results mediate the viability of the planned approach and exhibit its rightness for use in real world applications.

 KEYWORDS:

  1. Ac-dc converter
  2. Power factor
  3. THD
  4. Voltage regulation

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

image001

Figure 1. Power Factor Correction Control of Boost Converter

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 image002

 Figure 2. Steady State Input AC Voltage and Input AC Current Waveform

image003

Figure 3. Steady State Rectified DC Voltage and Rectified DC Current Waveform

image004

Figure 4. Steady State Regulated DC Output Voltage and Regulated DC Output Current Waveform

image005

Figure 5. Power Factor Measurement of the Proposed Power Factor Correction Boost Converter

image006

Figure 6. FFT Spectrum of the AC input current of Proposed Power Factor Correction Boost Converter

image007

Figure 7. Transient response of Input AC Voltage and Input AC Current Waveform

image008

Figure 8. Transient Response of Rectified DC Voltage and Rectified DC Current Waveform

image009

Figure 9. Transient Response of Regulated DC Output Voltage and Regulated DC Output Current Waveform

image010

Figure 10. Power Factor Measurement of the Proposed Power Factor Correction Boost Converter at transient condition

CONCLUSION:

A single stage power factor correction strategy has been planned for full bridge diode rectifier fed boost converter to support a 400W, lA DC load. The suitability of boost converter for power factor correction has been decorated by the elimination of input capacitor filter and low output ripple factor. The develop control design has been efficiently organize to correct the power factor in addition providing good voltage regulation.

THD

The transient work has been represent to up-heave the strength of the control structure with an able output regulation and effective harmonic elimination. The control plan has been feed to standardize the THD level of the system that prevents the adverse effects of harmonics being injected in the grid.

PASSIVE COMPONENTS

The exclusion of additional passive components and interleaving arrangement has been promote to reduce the size thus making it more adaptive to low cost compact electronic applications with high standards .

 REFERENCES:

[1] M. Milanovic, F . Mihalic, K. Jezernik and U. Milutinovic,” Single phase unity power factor correction circuits with coupled inductance,” Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 1992, vol.2, pp. l077-1082.

[2] M. Orabi and T Ninomiya, “Novel nonlinear representation for two stage power-factor-correction converter instability,” IEEE International Symposium on Industrial Electronics, 2003, voU, pp- 270-274.

[3] Yu Hung, Dan Chen, Chun-Shih Huang and Fu-Sheng Tsai, “Pulse-skipping power factor correction control schemes for ACIDC power converters,” Fourth International Conference on Power Engineering, Energy and Electrical Drives (POWERENG), 2013, pp-I087-1092.

[4] Lu, D.D. -C, H.H.-C. lu, V. Pjevalica, “A Single-Stage AC/DC Converter With High Power Factor, Regulated Bus Voltage, and Output Voltage,” Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on, vo1.23, issue. I, pp. 218-228, Jan. 2008.

[5] M. Narimani and G. Moschopoulos, “A New Single-Phase SingleStage Three-Level Power Factor Correction AC-DC Converter,” Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on , vol.27, issue.6, pp. 2888- 2899, June. 2012.