Modeling, Implementation and Performance Analysis of a Grid-Connected Photovoltaic/Wind Hybrid Power System

ABSTRACT:

This paper investigates dynamic modeling, design and control strategy of a grid-connected photovoltaic (PV)/wind hybrid power system. The hybrid power system consists of PV station and wind farm that are integrated through main AC-bus to enhance the system performance. The Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) technique is applied to both PV station and wind farm to extract the maximum power from hybrid power system during variation of the environmental conditions. The modeling and simulation of hybrid power system have been implemented using Matlab/Simulink software. The effectiveness of the MPPT technique and control strategy for the hybrid power system is evaluated during different environmental conditions such as the variations of solar irradiance and wind speed. The simulation results prove the effectiveness of the MPPT technique in extraction the maximum power from hybrid power system during variation of the environmental conditions. Moreover, the hybrid power system operates at unity power factor since the injected current to the electrical grid is in phase with the grid voltage. In addition, the control strategy successfully maintains the grid voltage constant irrespective of the variations of environmental conditions and the injected power from the hybrid power system.

KEYWORDS:

  1. PV
  2. Wind
  3. Hybrid system
  4. Wind turbine
  5. DFIG
  6. MPPT control

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. The system configuration of PV/wind hybrid power system.

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

(a) Solar Irradiance.

(b) PV array voltage.

(c) PV array current.

(d) A derivative of power with respect to voltage (dPpv/dVpv).

Fig. 2. Performance of PV array during the variation of solar irradiance.

(a) PV DC-link Voltage.

(b) d-q axis components of injected current from PV station.

(c) Injected active and reactive power from PV station.

(d) Grid voltage and injected current from PV station.

(e) The power factor of the inverter.

(f) Injected current from PV station.

Fig. 3. Performance of PV station during variation of the solar irradiance.

(a) Wind speed profile.

(b) The mechanical torque of wind turbine.

(c) The DC-bus voltage of DFIG.

(d) Injected active and reactive power from the wind farm.

(e) The power factor of the wind farm.

(f) Injected current from the wind farm.

Fig. 4. Performance of wind farm during variation of the wind speed.

(a) Power flow between PV station, wind farm, and hybrid power system.

(b) Injected active and reactive power from the hybrid system.

(c) PCC-bus voltage.

Fig. 5. Performance of hybrid power system at PCC-bus.

 CONCLUSION:

In this paper, a detailed dynamic modeling, design and control strategy of a grid-connected PV/wind hybrid power system has been successfully investigated. The hybrid power system consists of PV station of 1MW rating and a wind farm of 9 MW rating that are integrated through main AC-bus to inject the generated power and enhance the system performance. The incremental conductance MPPT technique is applied for the PV station to extract the maximum power during variation of the solar irradiance. On the other hand, modified MPPT technique based on mechanical power measurement is implemented to capture the maximum power from wind farm during variation of the wind speed. The effectiveness of the MPPT techniques and control strategy for the hybrid power system is evaluated during different environmental conditions such as the variations of solar irradiance and wind speed. The simulation results have proven the validity of the MPPT techniques in extraction the maximum power from hybrid power system during variation of the environmental conditions. Moreover, the hybrid power system successfully operates at unity power factor since the injected reactive power from hybrid power system is equal to zero. Furthermore, the control strategy successfully maintains the grid voltage constant regardless of the variations of environmental conditions and the injected power from the hybrid power system.

REFERENCES:

[1] H. Laabidi and A. Mami, “Grid connected Wind-Photovoltaic hybrid system,” in 2015 5th International Youth Conference on Energy (IYCE), pp. 1-8,2015.

[2] A. B. Oskouei, M. R. Banaei, and M. Sabahi, “Hybrid PV/wind system with quinary asymmetric inverter without increasing DC-link number,” Ain Shams Engineering Journal, vol. 7, pp. 579-592, 2016.

[3] R. Benadli and A. Sellami, “Sliding mode control of a photovoltaic-wind hybrid system,” in 2014 International Conference on Electrical Sciences and Technologies in Maghreb (CISTEM), pp. 1-8, 2014.

[4] A. Parida and D. Chatterjee, “Cogeneration topology for wind energy conversion system using doubly-fed induction generator,” IET Power Electronics, vol. 9, pp. 1406-1415, 2016.

[5] B. Singh, S. K. Aggarwal, and T. C. Kandpal, “Performance of wind energy conversion system using a doubly fed induction generator for maximum power point tracking,” in Industry Applications Society Annual Meeting (IAS), 2010 IEEE, 2010, pp. 1-7.

 

ieee electrical projects in jangaon

IEEE Electrical Projects jangaon-2015/2016/2017
Software Used: Matlab/Simulink
Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc
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Asoka technologies provide IEEE Electrical Projects jangaon
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.
Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.
POWER ELECTRONICS is the application of solid-state electronics to the control and conversion of electric power. The first high power electronic devices were mercury-arc valves. In modern systems the conversion is performed with semiconductor switching devices such as diodes, thyristors and transistors, pioneered by R. D. Middlebrook and others beginning in the 1950s. In contrast to electronic systems concerned with transmission and processing of signals and data, in power electronics substantial amounts of electrical energy are processed. An AC/DC converter (rectifier) is the most typical power electronics device found in many consumer electronic devices, e.g. television sets, personal computers, battery chargers, etc. The power range is typically from tens of watts to several hundred watts. In industry a common application is the variable speed drive (VSD) that is used to control an induction motor. The power range of VSDs start from a few hundred watts and end at tens of megawatts.
An ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM is a network of electrical components deployed to supply, transfer, and use electric power. An example of an electric power system is the the grid that provides power to an extended area. An electrical grid power system can be broadly divided into the generators that supply the power, the transmission system that carries the power from the generating centres to the load centres, and the distribution system that feeds the power to nearby homes and industries. Smaller power systems are also found in industry, hospitals, commercial buildings and homes. The majority of these systems rely upon three-phase AC power—the standard for large-scale power transmission and distribution across the modern world. Specialised power systems that do not always rely upon three-phase AC power are found in aircraft, electric rail systems, ocean liners and automobiles.
MATLAB (matrix laboratory) is a multi-paradigm numerical computing environment and fourth-generation programming language. A proprietary programming language developed by MathWorks, MATLAB allows matrix manipulations, plotting of functions and data, implementation of algorithms, creation of user interfaces, and interfacing with programs written in other languages, including C, C++, C#, Java, Fortran and Python.
SIMULINK, developed by MathWorks, is a graphical programming environment for modeling, simulating and analyzing multidomain dynamic systems. Its primary interface is a graphical block diagramming tool and a customizable set of block libraries. It offers tight integration with the rest of the MATLAB environment and can either drive MATLAB or be scripted from it. Simulink is widely used in automatic control and digital signal processing for multidomain simulation and Model-Based Design.
IEEE Electrical Projects jangaon

Innovative Electrical Projects for Engineering Students

Innovative electrical projects

Innovative electrical projects Electrical and Electronics Engineering involves designing, controlling and maintaining the electrical equipments. Some of the project areas of electrical field are power generation, power system equipment maintenance and handling, industrial control and robotics, power electronics and energy systems.

Conductors and insulators

Conductors are made of atoms whose outer, or valence, electrons have relatively weak bonds to their nuclei, as shown in this fanciful image of a copper atom. When a bunch of metal atoms are together, they gladly share their outer electrons with each other, creating a “swarm” of electrons not associated with a particular nucleus. A very small electric force can make the electron swarm move. Copper, gold, silver, and aluminum are good conductors. So is saltwater.
There are also poor conductors. Tungsten—a metal used for light bulb filaments—and carbon—in diamond form—are relatively poor conductors because their electrons are less prone to move.
Insulators are materials whose outer electrons are tightly bound to their nuclei. Modest electric forces are not able to pull these electrons free. When an electric force is applied, the electron clouds around the atom stretch and deform in response to the force, but the electrons do not depart. Glass, plastic, stone, and air are insulators. Even for insulators, though, electric force can always be turned up high enough to rip electrons away—this is called breakdown. That’s what is happening to air molecules when you see a spark.
Semiconductor materials fall between insulators and conductors. They usually act like insulators, but we can make them act like conductors under certain circumstances. The most well-known semiconductor material is Silicon (atomic number 14). Our ability to finely control the insulating and conducting properties of silicon allows us to create modern marvels like computers and mobile phones. The atomic-level details of how semiconductor devices work are governed by the theories of quantum mechanics.
Innovative electrical projects

A High Step-Up DC to DC Converter Under Alternating Phase Shift Control for Fuel Cell Power System

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates a novel pulse width modulation (PWM) scheme for two-phase interleaved boost converter with voltage multiplier for fuel cell power system by combining alternating phase shift (APS) control and traditional interleaving PWM control. The APS control is used to reduce the voltage stress on switches in light load while the traditional interleaving control is used to keep better performance in heavy load. The boundary condition for swapping between APS and traditional interleaving PWM control is derived. Based on the aforementioned analysis, a full power range control combining APS and traditional interleaving control is proposed. Loss breakdown analysis is also given to explore the efficiency of the converter. Finally, it is verified by experimental results.

 KEYWORDS: Boost converter, Fuel cell, Interleaved, Loss breakdown, Voltage multiplier.

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

image001

Fig. 1. Grid-connected power system based on fuel cell.

image002

Fig. 2. Main theoretical waveforms at boundary condition.

EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS:

 image003image004 image005 image006Fig.3 Experimental results at boundary condition with traditional interleaving control (L = 1158 μH, R = 2023 Ω, and D = 0.448). (a) CH1-S1 Driver Voltage, CH2 L1 Current, CH3-S1 Voltage Stress, CH4-Output Voltage, (b) CH1-S1 Driver Voltage, CH2 C1 Current, CH3-S1 Voltage Stress, CH4-OutputVoltage, (c) CH1-S1 DriverVoltage,CH2 D1 Current,CH3-S1 Voltage Stress, CH4-Output Voltage, (d) CH1-S1 Driver Voltage, CH2 DM1 Current, CH3-S1 Voltage Stress, CH4-Output Voltage.

image007

Fig. 4. Traditional interleaving control at nominal load (L = 1158 μH and R = 478 Ω).]

image008

Fig. 5. Traditional interleaving control in Zone A (L = 1158 μH and R = 1658 Ω).

CONCLUSION

The boundary condition is derived after stage analysis in this paper. The boundary condition classifies the operating states into two zones, i.e., Zone A and Zone B. The traditional interleaving control is used in Zone A while APS control is used in Zone B. And the swapping function is achieved by a logic unit. With the proposed control scheme, the converter can achieve low voltage stress on switches in all power range of the load, which is verified by experimental results.

 REFERENCES

[1] N. Sammes, Fuel Cell Technology: Reaching Towards Commercialization. London, U.K.: Springer-Verlag, 2006.

[2] G. Fontes, C. Turpin, S. Astier, and T. A. Meynard, “Interactions between fuel cells and power converters: Influence of current harmonics on a fuel cell stack,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 670–678, Mar. 2007.

[3] P. Thounthong, B. Davat, S. Rael, and P. Sethakul, “Fuel starvation,” IEEE Ind. Appl. Mag., vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 52–59, Jul./Aug. 2009.

[4] S.Wang,Y.Kenarangui, and B. Fahimi, “Impact of boost converter switching frequency on optimal operation of fuel cell systems,” in Proc. IEEE Vehicle Power Propulsion Conf., 2006, pp. 1–5.

[5] S. K. Mazumder, R. K. Burra, and K. Acharya, “A ripple-mitigating and energy-efficient fuel cell power-conditioning system,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 1437–1452, Jul. 2007.

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Solar Energy Projects

Solar energy is radiant light and heat from the Sun. It is harnessed using a range of ever-evolving technologies. Such as solar heating, photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, solar architecture, molten salt power plants and artificial photosynthesis.

It is an important source of renewable energy and its technologies are broadly characterized as either passive solar or active solar. Depending on how they capture and distribute solar energy or convert it into solar power. Active solar techniques include the use of photovoltaic systems, concentrated solar power and solar water heating to harness the energy. Passive solar techniques include orienting a building to the Sun. Selecting materials with favorable thermal mass or light-dispersing properties, and designing spaces that naturally circulate air.

The large magnitude of solar energy available makes it a highly appealing source of electricity. The United Nations Development Programme in its 2000 World Energy Assessment found that the annual potential of solar energy was 1,575–49,837 exajoules (EJ). This is several times larger than the total world energy consumption, which was 559.8 EJ in 2012.

In 2011, the International Energy Agency said that “the development of affordable, inexhaustible and clean solar energy technologies will have huge longer-term benefits. It will increase countries’ energy security through reliance on an indigenous, inexhaustible and mostly import-independent resource, enhance sustainability, reduce pollution, lower the costs of mitigating global warming, and keep fossil fuel prices lower than otherwise. These advantages are global. Hence the additional costs of the incentives for early deployment should be considered learning investments; they must be wisely spent and need to be widely shared”.

 

strong>Solar energy electrical Projects are available at

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