Commutation Torque Ripple Reduction in BLDC Motor Using Modified SEPIC Converter and Three-level NPC Inverter

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents a new power converter topology to suppress the torque ripple due to the phase current commutation of a brushless DC motor (BLDCM) drive system. A combination of a 3-level diode clamped multilevel inverter (3-level DCMLI), a modified single-ended primary-inductor converter (SEPIC), and a dc-bus voltage selector circuit are employed in the proposed torque ripple suppression circuit. For efficient suppression of torque pulsation, the dc-bus voltage selector circuit is used to apply the regulated dc-bus voltage from the modified SEPIC converter during the commutation interval. In order to further mitigate the torque ripple pulsation, the 3-level DCMLI is used in the proposed circuit. Finally, simulation and experimental results show that the proposed topology is an attractive option to reduce the commutation torque ripple significantly at low and high speed applications.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Brushless direct current motor (BLDCM)
  2. Dc-bus voltage control
  3. Modified single-ended primary-inductor converter
  4. 3-level diode clamped multilevel inverter (3-level DCMLI)
  5. Torque ripple

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Proposed converter topology with a dc-bus voltage selector circuit for BLDCM

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Fig. 2. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 1000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 5 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 3. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 6000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 5 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 4. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 1000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 20 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and switch a selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 5. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 6000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 20 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 6. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 1000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 80 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 7. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 6000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 80 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

CONCLUSION:

In this paper, a commutation torque ripple reduction circuit has been proposed using 3-level DCMLI with modified SEPIC converter and a dc-bus voltage selector circuit. A laboratory-built drive system has been tested to verify the proposed converter topology. The suggested dc-bus voltage control strategy is more effective in torque ripple reduction in the commutation interval. The proposed topology accomplishes the successful reduction of torque ripple in the commutation period and experimental results are presented to compare the performance of the proposed control technique with the conventional 2-level inverter, 3-level DCMLI, 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and the switch selection circuit-fed BLDCM. In order to obtain significant torque ripple suppression, quietness and higher efficiency, 3-level DCMLI with modified SEPIC converter and the voltage selector circuit is a most suitable choice to obtain high-performance operation of BLDCM. The proposed topology may be used for the torque ripple suppression of BLDCM with the very low stator winding inductance.

REFERENCES:

[1] N. Milivojevic, M. Krishnamurthy, Y. Gurkaynak, A. Sathyan, Y.-J. Lee, and A. Emadi, “Stability analysis of FPGA-based control of brushless DC motors and generators using digital PWM technique,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 343–351, Jan. 2012.

[2] X. Huang, A. Goodman, C. Gerada, Y. Fang, and Q. Lu, “A single sided matrix converter drive for a brushless dc motor in aerospace applications,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, no. 9, pp. 3542–3552, Sep. 2012.

[3] X. Huang, A. Goodman, C. Gerada, Y. Fang, and Q. Lu, “Design of a five-phase brushless DC motor for a safety critical aerospace application,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, no. 9, pp. 3532-3541, Sep. 2012.

[4] J.-G. Lee, C.-S. ark, J.-J. Lee, G. H. Lee, H.-I. Cho, and J.-P. Hong, “Characteristic analysis of brushless motor condering drive type,” KIEE, pp. 589-591, Jul. 2002.

Power Factor Correction in Bridgeless-Luo Converter Fed BLDC Motor Drive

IEEE Transactions on Industry Applications, 2013

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents a power factor correction (PFC) based bridgeless-Luo (BL-Luo) converter fed brushless DC (BLDC) motor drive. A single voltage sensor is used for the speed control of BLDC motor and PFC at AC mains. The voltage follower control is used for a BL-Luo converter operating in discontinuous inductor current mode (DICM). The speed of the BLDC motor is controlled by an approach of variable DC link voltage, which allows a low frequency switching of voltage source inverter (VSI) for electronic commutation of BLDC motor; thus offers reduced switching losses. The proposed BLDC motor drive is designed to operate over a wide range of speed control with an improved power quality at AC mains. The power quality indices thus obtained are under the recommended limits of IEC 61000-3-2. The performance of the proposed drive is validated with test results obtained on a developed prototype of the drive.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Bridgeless Luo Converter
  2. Brushless DC motor
  3. Power Factor Correction
  4. Power Quality
  5. Voltage Source Inverter

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Proposed PFC BL-Luo Converter fed BLDC motor drive.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Fig. 2. Test results of proposed BLDC motor drive (a) At rated load  torque on BLDC motor with Vdc=50V and Vs=220V, (b) At rated load torque on BLDC motor with Vdc=200V and Vs=220V

Fig. 3. Test results of proposed BLDC motor drive showing (a) iLi1, iLo1, VC1 with Vs, (b) PFC converter’s switch voltage and current at rated load torque on BLDC motor (c) Enlarged waveforms of PFC converter’s switch voltage and current.

Fig. 4. Test results of proposed BLDC motor drive showing dynamic performance (a) during starting at 50V, (b) during change in DC link voltage from 100V to 150V, (c) during change in supply voltage from 250 to 180V.

CONCLUSION:

A Power Factor Correction based BL-Luo converter fed BLDC motor drive has been proposed for wide range of speeds and supply voltages. A single voltage sensor based speed control of BLDC motor using a concept of variable DC link voltage has been used. The PFC BL-Luo converter has been designed to operate in DICM and to act as an inherent power factor preregulator. An electronic commutation of the BLDC motor has been used which utilizes a low frequency operation of VSI for reduced switching losses. The proposed BLDC motor drive has been designed and its performance is simulated in MATLAB/Simulink environment for achieving an improved power quality over wide range of speed control. Finally, the performance of proposed drive has been verified experimentally on a developed hardware prototype. A satisfactory performance of proposed drive has been achieved and is a recommended solution for low power applications.

REFERENCES:

[1] C. L. Xia, Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motor Drives and Controls, Wiley Press, Beijing, 2012.

[2] T. Kenjo and S. Nagamori, Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motors, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1985.

[3] R. Krishnan, Electric Motor Drives: Modeling, Analysis and Control, Pearson Education, India, 2001.

[4] T. J Sokira and W. Jaffe, Brushless DC Motors: Electronic Commutation and Control, Tab Books, USA, 1989.

[5] H. A. Toliyat and S. Campbell, DSP-based Electromechanical Motion Control, CRC Press, New York, 2004.

power factor correction

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Brushless DC motor drive with power factor regulation using Landsman converter

IET Power Electronics, 2016

 ABSTRACT: This study presents a novel configuration of power factor regulation (PFR)-based Landsman converter feeding a brushless DC motor (BLDCM) drive for low-power (400 W) white goods applications. The speed control of the drive is achieved through adjusting the DC bus voltage of voltage source inverter (VSI) feeding to a BLDCM. Moreover, low frequency switching signals are used for electronic commutation of BLDCM, which reduces the switching power losses of six solid-state switches of VSI. This Landsman converter-based front-end power factor corrector operating in discontinuous inductor current mode is used to control DC bus voltage and PFR is achieved inherently. The DC bus voltage of the drive is controlled by using a single DC voltage sensor. For evaluating the performance of proposed drive, a prototype is developed in the laboratory. The performance of the BLDCM is also analysed for its operation at varying AC mains voltage (90–265 V). Experiential results for power quality indices are found within the limits of power quality standard IEC 61000-3-2.

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1Circuit configurations of a PFR based

Proposed drive scheme of a Landsman converter fed PMBLDCM drive

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

Fig. 2 Performance of proposed drive at rated torque on motor

a Steady-state performance of the proposed BLDCM drive at rated load on BLDCM with DC-link voltage as 200 V and supply voltage as 220 V

b–d Obtained power quality indices

Fig. 3 Performance of proposed drive at rated load on motor

a Steady-state performance of the proposed BLDCM drive at rated load on BLDCM with DC-link voltage as 60 V and supply voltage as 220 V

b–d Obtained power quality indices

Fig. 4 Performance of PFR-based Landsman converter

a Input and output inductor’s currents and intermediate capacitor’s waveforms

b Current and voltage stress on a PFR switch at rated load on BLDCM at rated condition

Fig. 5 Dynamic performances of the proposed BLDCM drive system during

a Starting at 60 V

b Speed control for variation in DC bus voltage from 100 to 150 V

c Load variation

d Supply voltage change from 260 to 210 V

CONCLUSION:

A PFR-based Landsman converter fed BLDCM drive has been proposed for the use in low power household appliances. Adjustable voltage control of DC bus of VSI has been used to control the speed of BLDCM which eventually has given the freedom to operate the VSI in low frequency switching operation for minimum switching losses. A front-end Landsman converter-based PFR operating in DICM has been applied for double objectives of DC bus voltage control and achieving a UPF at AC supply. Resulted performance for presented drive has been found quite satisfactory for its operation at variation of speed over a wide range. A prototype of Landsman-based BLDCM drive has been implemented with acceptable test results for its operation over complete speed range and its operation over universal AC mains. The stress of the PFR converter switch has been evaluated to conclude its feasibility. The obtained power quality parameters are found within the limit of various international standards like as IEC 61000-3-2.

REFERENCES:

1 Gieras, J.F., Wing, M.: ‘Permanent magnet motor technology-design and application’ (Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, 2011)

2 Xia, C.L.: ‘Permanent magnet brushless DC motor drives and controls’ (Wiley Press, Beijing, 2012)

3 Zhu, Z.Q., Howe, D.: ‘Electrical machines and drives for electric, hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles’, IEEE Proc., 2007, 95, (4), pp. 746–765

4 Sozer, Y., Torrey, D.A., Mese, E.: ‘Adaptive predictive current control technique for permanent magnet synchronous motors’, IET Power Electron., 2013, 6, pp. 9–19

5 Hung, C.W., Lin, C.T., Liu, C.W., et al.: ‘A variable-sampling controller for brushless DC motor drives with low-resolution position sensors’, IEEE Trans.Ind. Electron., 2007, 54, (5), pp. 2846–2852

Commutation Torque Ripple Reduction in BLDC Motor Using Modified SEPIC Converter and Three-level NPC Inverter

IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, 2016

ABSTRACT: This paper presents a new power converter topology to suppress the torque ripple due to the phase current commutation of a brushless DC motor (BLDCM) drive system. A combination of a 3-level diode clamped multilevel inverter (3-level DCMLI), a modified single-ended primary-inductor converter (SEPIC), and a dc-bus voltage selector circuit are employed in the proposed torque ripple suppression circuit. For efficient suppression of torque pulsation, the dc-bus voltage selector circuit is used to apply the regulated dc-bus voltage from the modified SEPIC converter during the commutation interval. In order to further mitigate the torque ripple pulsation, the 3-level DCMLI is used in the proposed circuit. Finally, simulation and experimental results show that the proposed topology is an attractive option to reduce the commutation torque ripple significantly at low and high speed applications.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Brushless direct current motor (BLDCM),
  2. Dc-bus voltage control
  3. Modified single-ended primary-inductor converter
  4. Level diode clamped multilevel inverter (3-level DCMLI)
  5. Torque ripple

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1. Proposed converter topology with a dc-bus voltage selector circuit for BLDCM

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

Fig. 2. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 1000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 5 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 3 Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 6000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 5 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

 

Fig. 4 Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 1000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 20 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and switch a selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 5 Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 6000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 20 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology

Fig. 6. Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 1000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 80 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology.

Fig. 7 Simulated waveforms of phase current and torque at 6000 rpm and 0.825 Nm with 80 kHz switching frequency. (a) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter. (b) BLDCM fed by 3-level DCMLI. (c) BLDCM fed by 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and a switch selection circuit. (d) BLDCM fed by proposed topology

CONCLUSION:

In this paper, a commutation torque ripple reduction circuit has been proposed using 3-level DCMLI with modified SEPIC converter and a dc-bus voltage selector circuit. A laboratory-built drive system has been tested to verify the proposed converter topology. The suggested dc-bus voltage control strategy is more effective in torque ripple reduction in the commutation interval. The proposed topology accomplishes the successful reduction of torque ripple in the commutation period and experimental results are presented to compare the performance of the proposed control technique with the conventional 2-level inverter, 3-level DCMLI, 2-level inverter with SEPIC converter and the switch selection circuit-fed BLDCM. In order to obtain significant torque ripple suppression, quietness and higher efficiency, 3-level DCMLI with modified SEPIC converter and the voltage selector circuit is a most suitable choice to obtain high-performance operation of BLDCM. The proposed topology may be used for the torque ripple suppression of BLDCM with the very low stator winding inductance.

REFERENCES:

[1] N. Milivojevic, M. Krishnamurthy, Y. Gurkaynak, A. Sathyan, Y.-J. Lee, and A. Emadi, “Stability analysis of FPGA-based control of brushless DC motors and generators using digital PWM technique,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, no. 1, pp. 343–351, Jan. 2012.

[2] X. Huang, A. Goodman, C. Gerada, Y. Fang, and Q. Lu, “A single sided matrix converter drive for a brushless dc motor in aerospace applications,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, no. 9, pp. 3542–3552, Sep. 2012.

[3] X. Huang, A. Goodman, C. Gerada, Y. Fang, and Q. Lu, “Design of a five-phase brushless DC motor for a safety critical aerospace application,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 59, no. 9, pp. 3532-3541, Sep. 2012.

[4] J.-G. Lee, C.-S. Park, J.-J. Lee, G. H. Lee, H.-I. Cho, and J.-P. Hong, “Characteristic analysis of brushless motor condering drive type,” KIEE, pp. 589-591, Jul. 2002.

[5] T. H. Kim and M. Ehsani, “Sensorless control of BLDC motors from near-zero to high speeds,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 1635–1645, Nov. 2004.

 

 

A New BLDC Motor Drives Method Based on BUCK Converter for Torque Ripple Reduction

2006, IEEE

ABSTRACT: This paper presents a comprehensive analysis on torque ripples of brushless dc motor drives in conduction region and commutation region. A novel method for reducing the torque ripple in brushless dc motors with a single current sensor has been proposed by adding BUCK converter in the front of 3-phase inverter.In such drives, torque ripple suppression technique is theoretically effective in commutation region as well as conduction region. Effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed control method is verified through experiments.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Brushless dc motor
  2. Torque ripple
  3. Conduction region
  4. Commutation region

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

Fig1. The new proposed circuit configuration

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

Fig.2. The 2-phase current-waveforms of conventional modulation mode

Fig.3. The 2-phase current-waveforms of new proposed modulation mode

Fig.4.The commutation current-waveforms of conventional modulation mode

Fig.5.The commutation current-waveforms of new proposed modulation mode

CONCLUSION:

In this paper,a new torque ripple reduction method based on buck converter has been proposed for brushless dc motor drives using a single dc current sensor. In such control method, the dc-link current sensor can give correct information corresponding to the motor phase currents to eliminate torque ripples in conduction region. Meanwhile, torque ripples have been attenuated effectively during commutation region. Subsequently effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed control method are verified through experiments.

REFERENCES:

[1] Joong-Ho Song and Ick Choy, “Commutation torque ripple reduction in brushless DC motor drives using a single DC current sensor,”IEEE Trans. on Power Electronics,vol. 19, No.2 ,pp.312-319,March 2004.

[2] Byoung-Hee Kang,Choel-Ju Kim,Hyung-Su Mok and Gyu-Ha Choe, “Analysis of torque ripple in BLDC motor with commutation time,”Proceedings of IEEE,vol.2,pp.1044-1048, June 2001.

[3] Carlson R,Lajoie-Mazenc M and Fagundes J.C.d.S, “Analysis of torque ripple due to phase communtation in brushless DC machines,”IEEE Trans. on Industry Applications,vol.28,no.3, pp.632-638,May-June 1992.

[4] Luk P.C.K and Lee C.K, “Efficient modeling for a brushless DC motor drive,”International Conference on Industrial Electronics,Control and Instrumentation,vol.1,pp.188-191, September 1994.

[5] Lei Hao,Toliyat,H.A, “BLDC motor full speed range operation including the flux-weakening region,”IEEE-IAS Annual Meeting,vol.1,pp.618-624, Octorber 2003.

BLDC Motor Driven Solar PV Array Fed Water Pumping System Employing Zeta Converter

BLDC Motor Driven Solar PV Array Fed Water Pumping System Employing Zeta Converter

 ABSTRACT:

This paper proposes a simple, cost effective and efficient brushless DC (BLDC) motor drive for solar photovoltaic (SPV) array fed water pumping system. A zeta converter is utilized in order to extract the maximum available power from the SPV array. The proposed control algorithm eliminates phase current sensors and adapts a fundamental frequency switching of the voltage source inverter (VSI), thus avoiding the power losses due to high frequency switching. No additional control or circuitry is used for speed control of the BLDC motor. The speed is controlled through a variable DC link voltage of VSI. An appropriate control of zeta converter through the incremental conductance maximum power point tracking (INC-MPPT) algorithm offers soft starting of the BLDC motor. The proposed water pumping system is designed and modeled such that the performance is not affected under dynamic conditions. The suitability of proposed system at practical operating conditions is demonstrated through simulation results using MATLAB/ Simulink followed by an experimental validation.

KEYWORDS:

  1. BLDC motor
  2. SPV array
  3. Water pump
  4. Zeta converter
  5. VSI
  6. INC-MPPT

 

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Fig.1 Configuration of proposed SPV array-Zeta converter fed BLDC motor drive for water pumping system

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig.2 Performances of the proposed SPV array based Zeta converter fed BLDC motor drive for water pumping

system (a) SPV array variables, (b) Zeta converter variables, and (c) BLDC motor-pump variables.

 

CONCLUSION:

The SPV array-zeta converter fed VSI-BLDC motor-pump for water pumping has been proposed and its suitability has been demonstrated by simulated results using MATLAB/Simulink and its sim-power-system toolbox. First, the proposed system has been designed logically to fulfil the various desired objectives and then modelled and simulated to examine the various performances under starting, dynamic and steady state conditions. The performance evaluation has justified the combination of zeta converter and BLDC motor drive for SPV array based water pumping. The system under study availed the various desired functions such as MPP extraction of the SPV array, soft starting of the BLDC motor, fundamental frequency switching of the VSI resulting in a reduced switching losses, reduced stress on IGBT switch and the components of zeta converter by operating it in continuous conduction mode and stable operation. Moreover, the proposed system has operated successfully even under the minimum solar irradiance.

REFERENCES:

  • Uno and A. Kukita, “Single-Switch Voltage Equalizer Using Multi- Stacked Buck-Boost Converters for Partially-Shaded Photovoltaic Modules,” IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, no. 99, 2014.
  • Arulmurugan and N. Suthanthiravanitha, “Model and Design of A Fuzzy-Based Hopfield NN Tracking Controller for Standalone PV Applications,” Electr. Power Syst. Res. (2014). Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.epsr.2014.05.007
  • Satapathy, K.M. Dash and B.C. Babu, “Variable Step Size MPPT Algorithm for Photo Voltaic Array Using Zeta Converter – A Comparative Analysis,” Students Conference on Engineering and Systems (SCES), pp.1-6, 12-14 April 2013.
  • Trejos, C.A. Ramos-Paja and S. Serna, “Compensation of DC-Link Voltage Oscillations in Grid-Connected PV Systems Based on High Order DC/DC Converters,” IEEE International Symposium on Alternative Energies and Energy Quality (SIFAE), pp.1-6, 25-26 Oct. 2012.
  • K. Dubey, Fundamentals of Electrical Drives, 2nd ed. New Delhi, India: Narosa Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., 2009.

Single Stage Solar PV Fed Brushless DC Motor Driven Water Pump

 

ABSTRACT:

In order to optimize the solar photovoltaic (PV) generated power using a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) technique, a DC-DC conversion stage is usually required in solar PV fed water pumping which is driven by a brushless DC (BLDC) motor. This power conversion stage  leads to an increased cost, size, complexity and reduced efficiency. As a unique solution, this work addresses a single stage solar PV energy conversion system feeding a BLDC motor-pump, which eliminates the DC-DC conversion stage. A simple control technique capable of operating the solar PV array at its peak power using a common voltage source inverter (VSI), is proposed for BLDC motor control. The proposed control eliminates the BLDC motor phase current sensors. No supplementary control is associated for the speed control of motor-pump and its soft start. The speed is controlled through the optimum power of solar PV array. The suitability of proposed system is manifested through its performance evaluation using MATLAB/Simulink based simulated results and experimental validation on a developed prototype, under the practical operating conditions.

KEYWORDS:

  1. MPPT
  2. Solar PV array
  3. BLDC motor
  4. Water pump
  5. VSI
  6. Soft starting
  7. Speed control

 

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

  

Fig.1 Proposed water pumping based on a single stage solar PV energy conversion system.

 

 

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

Fig.2 Steady state and starting performance of (a) PV array and (b) motor pump, of proposed system at 1 kW/m2.

Fig.3 Steady state and starting response of (a) PV array and (b) motor-pump, of proposed system at 200 W/m2.

 

Fig.4 Dynamic performance of (a) PV array and (b) BLDC motor Pump ,of Proposed water pumping system.

Fig. 5 Responses of (a) PV array and (b) BLDC motor, under partial shading

 

 

CONCLUSION:

The proposed BLDC motor driven water pumping based on a single stage solar PV generation has been validated through a demonstration of its various steady state, starting and dynamic performances. The system has been simulated using the MATLAB toolboxes, and implemented on an experimental prototype. The topology of the proposed system has provided a DC-DC converter-less solution for PV fed brushless DC motor driven water pumping. Moreover, the motor phase current sensing elements have been eliminated, resulting in a simple and cost- effective drive. The other desired functions are the speed control without any additional circuit and a soft start of the motor-pump. A detailed comparative analysis of the proposed and the existing topologies has ultimately manifested the superiority of the proposed work.

 

REFERENCES:

  • Jain and B. Singh, “An Adjustable DC Link Voltage Based Control of Multifunctional Grid Interfaced Solar PV System,” IEEE J. Emerg. Sel. Topics Power Electron., Early Access.
  • A. A. Radwan and Y. A. R. I. Mohamed, “Power Synchronization Control for Grid- Connected Current-Source Inverter-Based Photovoltaic Systems,” IEEE Trans. Energy Convers., vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 1023-1036, Sept. 2016.
  • Vithayasrichareon, G. Mills and I. F. MacGill, “Impact of Electric Vehicles and Solar PV on Future Generation Portfolio Investment,” IEEE Trans. Sustain. Energy, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 899- 908, July 2015.
  • K. Mishra and B. Singh, “A single stage solar PV array based water pumping system using SRM drive,” IEEE Ind. Appl. Soc. Annu. Meeting, Portland, OR, 2016, pp. 1-8.
  • Jain, A.K. Thopukara, R. Karampuri and V.T. Somasekhar, “A Single-Stage Photovoltaic System for a Dual-Inverter-Fed Open-End Winding Induction Motor Drive for Pumping Applications,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 30, no. 9, pp. 4809 – 4818, Sept. 2015.

Reduction of Commutation Torque Ripple in a Brushless DC Motor Drive

 

ABSTRACT:

This paper describes the reduction in torque ripple due to phase commutation of brushless dc motors. With two-phase 1200 electrical conduction for the inverter connected to the conventional three-phase BLDC machine, the commutation torque ripple occurs at every 60 electrical degrees when a change over from one phase to another occurs. This effect increases the commutation time at higher speeds which increases the torque ripple. The torque ripple is reduced by changing the switching mode from 1200 to a dual switching mode with 1200 switching at lower speeds and 1800 electrical for the inverter at higher speeds.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Brushless dc motor
  2. Current commutation
  3. Torque ripple
  4. Electric vehicle

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1. PWM inverter and equivalent circuit of BLDC motor

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

Fig.2. (a) Relative torque ripple amplitude and (b) The duration of commutation time

 

CONCLUSION:

This paper has presented an analytical study of torque ripple comparison due to commutation of phase currents in a brushless dc motor for both 1200 and 1800 conduction modes. The results have been validated by simulation and experimental verification. In three-phase switching mode at high speeds the torque ripple and losses are minimized and therefore the efficiency of the machine is increased. But the same cannot be achieved at low speed in this mode. On the other hand, the 1200 situation is exactly opposite. Thus a composite switching scheme is proposed for satisfactory operation of the machine at all speeds. The effectiveness of the method is validated by suitable experiments.

REFERENCES:

[1] T. Li, and G. Slemon, “Reduction of cogging torque in permanent magnet motors,” IEEE Trans. on Magnetics, vol.24, no.6, pp.2901-2903, Nov. 1988.

[2] R. Carlson, M. Lajoie-Mazenc, and J.C.D.S. Fagundes, “Analysis of torque ripple due to phase commutation in brushless DC machines,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol.28, no.3, pp. 632-638, May/Jun. 1992.

[3] H. Tan, “Controllability analysis of torque ripple due to phase commutation in brushless DC motors,” in Proc. 5th int. conf. Elect. Mach. And Syst., Aug. 18-20, 2001, vol.2, pp. 1317-1322.

[4] Y. Murai, Y. Kawase, K. Ohashi, K. Nagatake and K. Okuyama, “Torque ripple improvement for brushless DC miniature motors,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol.25, no.3, pp. 441-450, May/Jun. 1989.

[5] C.S. Berendsen, G. Champenois, and A. Bolopion, “Commutation strategies for brushless DC motors: Influence on instant torque,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol.8, no.2, pp. 231-236, Apr.1993.

Model and system simulation of Brushless DC motor based on SVPWM control

 

ABSTRACT:

According to the disadvantages as large torque ripple of square wave drive brushless DC motor control system, this paper adopted the sine wave drive the permanent magnet brushless DC motor control system based on the space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) control method. The simulation model of space vector pulse width modulation control method of the rotated speed of brushless DC motor and current double closed-loop control system is simulated and analyzed in MATLAB/SIMULINK. The simulation results have verified the reasonability and validity of the simulation model.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Brushless DC motor
  2. Modeling and simulation
  3. Space vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM)

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Figure 1 The overall system block diagram of BLDCM control system

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 

Figure 2 Speed information

Figure 3 Torque waveform

 

Figure 4 The motor stator three-phase current waveform

Figure 5 Phase A current use PWM and SVPWM control

 

CONCLUSION:

In this paper, the SVPWM control of BLDCM simulation model is established based on the MATLAB/SIMULINK, and used the classic speed, current double closed-loop PI control algorithm. From the output waveform, it can be seen the system corresponding speed fast, quickly achieve steady state. Plus load torque at t=0.1s, the speed happen fell but return to equilibrium state at soon. Three phase stator current waveform as nearly as sine wave. The simulation results show that the SVPWM control of BLDCM has good static and dynamic characteristics.

REFERENCES:

[1]Wu Quan-li, Huang Hong-quan. Simulation study of penmanent maagnet brushless DC motor based on PWM control. Electrical switches, Vol.5 (2010), p. 39-41

[2]Ma Ruiqing, Deng Junjun. Research on characteristic of sinusoidal current driving method for

BLDCM with hall position sensor. Micro-motor, Vol.7 (2011), p. 59-61

[3]Wang Shuhong. A control strategy of PMDC brushless motor based on SVPWM. Automation

Expo, Vol.10 (2008), p. 66-68

[4]Qiu Jianqi. SVPWM control for torque ripple attenuation of PM brushless DC motors. Small and medium-sized motor. Vol.2 (2003), p. 27-28

[5]Boyang Hu.180-Degree Commutation System of Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motor Drive Based on Speed and Current Control.2009 Sencond International Conference on Intelligent Computation Technology and Automation,Vol.2 (2009), p. 723-726

High-performance multilevel inverter drive of brushless DC Motor

ABSTRACT:

The brushless DC (BLDC) motor has numerous applications in high-power systems; it is simple in construction, is cheap, requires less maintenance, has higher efficiency, and has high power in the output unit. The BLDC motor is driven by an inverter. This paper presents design and simulation for a three-phase three-level inverter to drive the BLDC motor. The multilevel inverter is driven by discrete three-phase pulse width modulation (DPWM) generator that forced-commuted the IGBT’s three-level converters using three bridges to vectored outputs 12- pulses with three levels. Using DPWM with a three-level inverter solves the problem of harmonic distortions and low electromagnetic interference. This topology can attract attention in high-power and high-performance voltage applications. It provides a three-phase voltage source with amplitude, phase, and frequency that are controllable. The proposed model is used with the PID controller to follow the reference speed signal designed by variable steps. The system design is simulated by using Matlab/Simulink. Satisfactory results and high performance of the control with steady state and transient response are obtained. The results of the proposed model are compared with the variable DC-link control. The results of the proposed model are more stable and reliable.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Brushless DC Motor
  2. Multilevel Inverter
  3. High-Performance Drive
  4. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM)
  5. Maltlab
  6. Simulink

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

Figure 1. BLDC motor with MLI driven with PID controller.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Figure. 2. Output of three-phase three-level inverter with DPWM.

Figure 3. The sample from output of the DPWM

Figure 4. Analysis of response for the proposed MLI with PID controller of BLDC motor.

Fig. 5. Two outputs of controllers with proposed MLI and variable DC-link

CONCLUSION:

The proposed MLI performance analysis was successfully presented by using Matlab/Simulink software. The proposed topology can be easily extended to a higher-level inverter. The simulation results were sine waves and exhibited fewer ripples and low losses. This system would show its feasibility in practice. The vector control was described in adequate detail and was implemented with a three-level MLI. This method enabled the operation of the drive at zero direct axis stator current. Transient results were obtained when a DPWM was started from a standstill to a required speed. The performance of the vector control in achieving a fast reversal of PDPWM even at very high speed ranges is quite satisfactory. The performance of the proposed three-phase MLI was investigated and was found to be quite satisfactory. A comparison was made between the PID controller–based proposed model MLI and the controller with variable DC-link voltage. The results showed that the proposed model responded better in transient and steady states and was more reliability with high performance.

REFERENCES:

[1] P. D. Kiran, M. Ramachandra, “Two-Level and Five-Level Inverter Fed BLDC Motor Drives”, International Journal of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Research, Vol. 3, Issue 3, pp 71-82, Aug 2013

[2] N. Karthika, A. Sangari, R. Umamaheswari , “Performance Analysis of Multi Level Inverter with DC Link Switches for Renewable Energy Resources”, International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering, Volume-2, Issue-6, pp 171-176, May 2013

[3] A. Jalilvand R. Noroozian M. Darabian, “Modeling and Control Of Multi-Level Inverter for Three-Phase Grid-Connected Photovoltaic Sources”, International Journal on Technical and Physical Problems of Engineering, Iss. 15, Vol. 5, No.2, pp 35-43, June 2013

[4] P. Karuppanan, K. Mahapatra, “PI, PID and Fuzzy Logic Controlled Cascaded Voltage Source Inverter Based Active Filter For Power Line Conditioners”, Wseas Transactions On Power Systems, Issue 4, Volume 6, pp 100-109, October 2011

[5] D. Balakrishnan, D. Shanmugam, K.Indiradevi, “Modified Multilevel Inverter Topology for Grid Connected PV Systems”, American Journal of Engineering Research, Vol. 02, Iss.10, pp-378-384, 2013