Final year electrical projects in hyderabad

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Asoka technologies provide Final year electrical projects in hyderabad

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields `including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

POWER ELECTRONICS is the application of solid-state electronics to the control and conversion of electric power. The first high power electronic devices were mercury-arc valves. In modern systems the conversion is performed with semiconductor switching devices such as diodes, thyristors and transistors, pioneered by R. D. Middlebrook and others beginning in the 1950s. In contrast to electronic systems concerned with transmission and processing of signals and data, in power electronics substantial amounts of electrical energy are processed. An AC/DC converter (rectifier) is the most typical power electronics device found in many consumer electronic devices, e.g. television sets, personal computers, battery chargers, etc. The power range is typically from tens of watts to several hundred watts. In industry a common application is the variable speed drive (VSD) that is used to control an induction motor. The power range of VSDs start from a few hundred watts and end at tens of megawatts.

Final year electrical projects in telangana

Electrical engineering is a professional engineering discipline that generally deals with the study and application of electricityelectronics, and electromagnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broadcasting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Nine-level Asymmetrical Single Phase Multilevel Inverter Topology with Low switching frequency and Reduce device counts

 

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents a new asymmetrical single phase multilevel inverter topology capable of producing nine level output voltage with reduce device counts. In order to obtain the desired output voltage, dc sources are connected in all the combination of addition and subtraction through different switches. Proposed topology results in reduction of dc source, switch counts, losses, cost and size of the inverter. Comparison between the existing topologies shows that the proposed topology yields less component counts. Proposed topology is modeled and simulated using Matlab-Simulink software in order to verify the performance and feasibility of the circuit. A low frequency switching strategy is also proposed in this work. The results show that the proposed topology is capable to produce a nine-level output voltage with less number of component counts and acceptable harmonic distortion content.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Multilevel inverter
  2. Asymmetrical
  3. Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
  4. Low-frequency switching

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Proposed nine level inverter topology.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

  • (a) Output voltage waveform
  • (b) Voltage Output Harmonic spectrum
  • (c) Load current waveform
  • (d) Load Current Harmonic spectrum
  • Fig. 2. Simulation Output results at 50Hz fundamental frequency for R =150ohm, L= 240, P.F = 0.9

(a) Output voltage waveform

  • (b) Voltage Output Harmonic spectrum

  • (c) Load current waveform
  • (d) Load Current Harmonic spectrum
  • Fig. 3. Simulation Output results at 50Hz fundamental frequency for R = 150ohm, L= 240, P.F = 0.9

CONCLUSION:

In this paper a new single-phase multilevel inverter topology is presented. Proposed topology is capable of producing nine-level output voltage with reduce device counts. It can be used in medium and high power application with unequal dc sources. Different modes of operation are discussed in detail. On the bases of device counts, the proposed topology is compared with conventional as well as other asymmetrical nine-level inverter topologies presented in literature. Comparative study shows that, for nine level output, the proposed topology requires lesser component counts then the conventional and other topologies. Proposed circuit is modeled in Matlab/Simulink environment. Results obtained shows that topology works properly. Detailed Simulation analysis is carried out. THD obtained in the output voltage is 8.95% whereas the each harmonic order is < 5%, satisfies harmonic Standard (IEEE-519).

 REFERENCES:

[1] J. Rodriguez, L. G. Franquelo, S. Kouro, J. I. Leon, R. C. Portillo, M. A. M. Prats and M. A. Perez, “Multilevel Converters: An Enabling Technology for High-Power Applications”, IEEE Proceeding, Vol 97, No. 11, pp.1786 – 1817, November 2009.

[2] J. R. Espinoza, “Inverter”, Power Electronics Handbook, M. H. Rashid, Ed. New York, NY, USA: Elsevier, 2001,pp. 225 -269.

[3] L. M. Tolbert and T. G. Habetler, “Novel multilevel inverter carrier based PWM method”, IEEE Transactions on Indsutrial Apllications”, Vol. 35, No. 5, pp. 1098-1107, September 1999.

[4] S. Debnath, J. Qin, B. Bahrani, M. Saeedifard and P. Barbosa, “Operation, Control and Applications of the Modular Multilevel Converter: A Review”, IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, Vol. 30, No. 1, pp. 37-53, January 2015.

[5] L. G. Franquelo, J. Rodriguez, J. I. Leon, S. Kouro, R. C. Portillo and M. A. M. Prats, “The Age of Multilevel Converters Arrives”, IEEE Industrial Electronics magazine, Vol. 2, No. 2 pp. 28-39, June 2008.

Performance of Electric Springs with Multiple Variable Loads

 

ABSTRACT:

Electric Spring is an emerging smart grid technology, which can provide voltage support to weakly regulated system. This paper studies the effect of load variation on the performance of electric springs. Two different single phase circuits with intermittent power supply have been simulated for the study – with one electric spring and with two electric springs. The loads considered are linear and are identical. Results obtained in MATLAB/Simulink environment show that line voltage is regulated by electric spring irrespective of variation in load. A brief comparative study is done between the simulation results obtained from the two circuits to observe the effect of the additional electric spring. This study tests the effectiveness of electric springs in a circuit designed to be more realistic, i.e., when the loads are not ON all the time and multiple electric springs are distributed all over the grid.

 KEYWORDS:

  1. Demand Side Management
  2. Electric Spring
  3. Renewable Energy Sources

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Schematic Diagram of Electric Spring connected with Intermittent Renewable Energy Source

 BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Fig. 2. Block Diagram for Circuit with Two Electric Springs

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Fig. 3. RMS Voltage for Boosting action in single ES circuit

Fig. 4. Active and Reactive power consumption of ES during Boosting action in single ES circuit

Fig. 5. RMS Voltage for Reduction action in single ES circuit

Fig. 6. Active and Reactive power consumption of ES during Reduction action in single ES circuit

Fig. 7. RMS Voltage for Boosting action in double ES circuit

Fig. 8. Active and Reactive power consumption of ES during Boosting action in double ES circuit

Fig. 9. RMS Voltage for Reduction action in double ES circuit

Fig. 10. Active and Reactive power consumption of ES during Reduction action in double ES circuit

CONCLUSION:

This paper demonstrates the effects of load variation on the performance of ES. From the simulation results, it can be noted that, for boosting mode of operation, the ES can regulate the line voltage at the reference value irrespective of variation in load. However, for reduction mode of operation, the load variation causes fluctuations in the line voltage even when the ES is operating. This might be improved by making the circuit more inductive, which will assist the ES for reduction action. The basic single ES circuit was modified by adding an extra ES to it. It was observed that the reactive power consumption of each ES decreased by almost 50% for both modes of operation. Therefore we can conclude that as the number of ES in the circuit increases by a factor of ‘n’, the reactive power consumed by each ES to carry out the same magnitude of regulation decreases by a factor of ‘n’. This decreases the stress on each ES as well as the inverter rating for ES. For this study, the linear and identical loads have been considered, which can be further extended to non-linear and non-identical loads. Also, the random load profile can be replaced with a real time load profile.

REFERENCES:

[1] IEA, World Energy Outlook 2015: IEA. Available:

http://www.worldenergyoutlook.org/media/weowebsite/2015/WEO2015 _Factsheets.pdf

[2] P. P. Varaiya, F. F. Wu and J. W. Bialek, “Smart Operation of Smart Grid: Risk-Limiting Dispatch,” in Proceedings of the IEEE, vol. 99, no. 1, pp. 40-57, Jan. 2011.

[3] D. Westermann and A. John, “Demand Matching Wind Power Generation With Wide-Area Measurement and Demand-Side Management,” in IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 145-149, March 2007.

[4] P. Palensky and D. Dietrich, “Demand Side Management: Demand Response, Intelligent Energy Systems, and Smart Loads,” in IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 381-388, Aug. 2011.

[5] A. Mohsenian-Rad, V. W. S. Wong, J. Jatskevich, R. Schober, and A. Leon-Garcia, “Autonomous demand-side management based on gametheoretic energy consumption scheduling for the future smart grid,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 320–331, Dec. 2010.

Reduction of Energy Storage Requirements in Future Smart Grid Using Electric Springs

 

ABSTRACT:

The electric spring is an emerging technology proven to be effective in i) stabilizing smart grid with substantial penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources and ii) enabling load demand to follow power generation. The subtle change from output voltage control to input voltage control of a reactive power controller offers the electric spring new features suitable for future smart grid applications. In this project, the effects of such subtle control change are highlighted, and the use of the electric springs in reducing energy storage requirements in power grid is theoretically proven and practically demonstrated in an experimental setup of a 90 kVApower grid.Unlike traditional Statcom and StaticVar Compensation technologies, the electric spring offers not only reactive power compensation but also automatic power variation in non-critical loads. Such an advantageous feature enables noncritical loads with embedded electric springs to be adaptive to future power grid. Consequently, the load demand can follow power generation, and the energy buffer and therefore energy storage requirements can be reduced.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Distributed power systems
  2. Energy storage
  3. Smart grid
  4. Stability

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1. Experimental setup based on the 90 kVA Smart Grid Hardware Simulation System at the Maurice Hancock Smart Energy Laboratory.

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. Measured rms power line voltage (vs) and non-critical load voltage (vo)

Fig. 3. Measured average powers of the wind power simulator (PG+PR), battery storage (PS) and non-critical load(P1)

Fig. 4. Measured power (Ps) and energy change (Es) of the battery storage.

Fig. 5. Measured electric spring reactive power (QES), critical load voltage (VR2) and power (P2).

 CONCLUSION:

In this paper, the differences between the output voltage control and the input voltage control of a reactive power controller are highlighted. While energy storage is an effective but expensive means to balance power supply and demand, an analysis and practical confirmation are presented to show that electric springs can reduce energy storage requirements in a power grid. Electric springs allow the non-critical load power to vary with the renewable energy profile. By reducing the instantaneous power imbalance of power supply and demand, electric springs allow the non-critical load demand profile to follow the power generation profile and reduce the energy storage requirements in power grid. This important point has been theoretically proved and practically verified in an experimental setup. Due to the advantageous features such as enabling the load demand to follow the power generation, the reduction of energy storage requirements, the reactive power compensation for voltage regulation, and the possibility of both active and reactive power control [28], electric springs open a door to distributed stability control for future smart grid with substantial penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources.

REFERENCES:

[1] D. Westermann and A. John, “Demand matching wind power generation with wide-area measurement and demand-side management,” IEEE Trans. Energy Convers., vol. 22, no. 1 , pp. 145–149, 2007.

[2] P. Palensky and D. Dietrich, “Demand side management: Demand response, intelligent energy systems, and smart loads,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Inform., vol. 7 , no. 3 , pp. 381–388, 2011.

[3] P. Varaiya, F. Wu, and J. Bialek, “Smart operation of smart grid: Risklimiting dispatch,” Proc. IEEE, vol. 99, no. 1 , pp. 40–57, 2011.

[4] I. Koutsopoulos and L. Tassiulas, “Challenges in demand load control for the smart grid,” IEEE Netw., vol. 25, no. 5 , pp. 16–21, 2011.

[5] A. Mohsenian-Rad, V. W. S. Wong, J. Jatskevich, R. Schober, and A. Leon-Garcia, “Autonomous demand-side management based on gametheoretic energy consumption scheduling for the future smart grid,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1 , no. 3 , pp. 320–331, 2011.

 

 

Droop Control of Distributed Electric Springs for Stabilizing Future Power Grid

ABSTRACT:

This paper describes the droop control method for parallel operation of distributed electric springs for stabilizing ac power grid. It provides a methodology that has the potential of allowing reactive power controllers to work in different locations of the distribution lines of an ac power supply and for these reactive power controllers to support and stabilize the ac mains voltage levels at their respective locations on the distribution lines. The control scheme allows these reactive power controllers to have automatically adjustable voltage references according to the mains voltage levels at the locations of the distribution network. The control method can be applied to reactive power controllers embedded in smart electric loads distributed across the power grid for stabilizing and supporting the ac power supply along the distribution network. The proposed distributed deployment of electric springs is envisaged to become an emerging technology potentially useful for stabilizing power grids with substantial penetration of distributed and intermittent renewable power sources or weakly regulated ac power grid.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Droop control
  2. Electric springs
  3. Smart gird
  4. Voltage regulation

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1. Single phase diagram of the experimental setup of the power grid and loads (with 3 distributed electric springs working as a group).

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. (a) Measured root-mean-square values of the mains voltage VS1,VS2 and VS3 (b) Measured root-mean-square values of the mains voltage VS1,VS2 and VS3 from 1800 to 1440 sec (ES activated without the proposed droop control) (c) Measured root-mean-square values of the mains voltage VS1,VS2 and VS3 from 1800 to 2160 sec (ES activated with the proposed droop control).

Fig. 3. Measured average value of reactive power generated by the 3 electric springs (Qa1 ,Qa2 and Qa3 ).

Fig. 4. Measured modulation indexes of the electric springs M1,M2 and M3 .

Fig. 5. Measured average value of the critical load power PR1,PR2 and PR3 .

Fig. 6. Measured root-mean-square values of the non-critical load voltage Vo1 ,Vo2 and Vo3 .

Fig. 7. Measured average value of the non-critical load power Po1,Po2 and Po3

.CONCLUSION:

A control scheme has been successfully developed and implemented for a group of electric springs. It enables individual electric springs to generate their mains voltage reference values according to their installation locations in the distribution lines and to work in co-operative manner, instead of fighting against one another, therefore allowing the electric springs to work in group to maximize their reactive power compensation effects for voltage regulation. The control method also leads to more evenly distribution of load power shedding among the non-critical loads. The attractive features of the control scheme have been successfully verified in an experimental smart grid setup.

With the droop control scheme,many electric springs of small VA ratings could be embedded into non-critical loads such as electric water heaters and refrigerators to form a new generation of smart loads that are adaptive to power grid with substantial penetration of renewable energy sources of distributed and intermittent nature. If many small electric springs are deployed in the power grid in a distributed manner, their collective voltage stabilizing efforts can be added together. Because the electric springs allow these smart loads to consume power following the varying profile of intermittent renewable energy sources, they have the potential to solve the stability problems arising from the intermittent nature of renewable energy sources and ensure that the load demand will follow power generation, which is the new control paradigm for future smart grid. Since the electric appliances embedded with the electric springs can share load shedding automatically, this approach should be more consumer-friendly when compared with the on-off control of electric appliances. For example, shutting down refrigerators is intrusive and inconvenient to the consumers (and may involve consumers’ rights issues) and requires some forms of central control. Allowing many smart refrigerators to shed some load without being noticed and central control is more consumer- friendly.

The individual operations of the electric springs have previously been evaluated. The successful implementation of the droop control for 3 electric springs working as a group in a small distributed network in this study is a just a step forward to confirm that multiple electric springs can work together without ICT technology. The collective effects of electric springs and their capacity are new topics that deserve further investigations. Extensive simulation studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of many such electric springs working together in a large-scale power system model.

REFERENCES:

[1] P. P. Varaiya, F. F. Wu, and J. W. Bialek, “Smart operation of smart grid: Risk-limiting dispatch,” Proc. IEEE, vol. 99, no. 1, pp. 40–57, 2011.

[2] D. Westermann and A. John, “Demand matching wind power generation with wide-area measurement and demand-side management,” IEEE Trans. Energy Conversion, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 145–149, 2007.

[3] P. Palensky and D. Dietrich, “Demand side management: Demand response, intelligent energy systems, and smart loads,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Informatics, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 381–388, 2011.

[4] A. Mohsenian-Rad, V. W. S. Wong, J. Jatskevich, R. Schober, and A. Leon-Garcia, “Autonomous demand-side management based on gametheoretic energy consumption scheduling for the future smart grid,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 320–331, 2010.

[5] M. Parvania and M. Fotuhi-Firuzabad, “Demand response scheduling by stochastic SCUC,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 89–98,2010.

Cascaded Multilevel Inverter Based Electric Spring for Smart Grid Applications

 

ABSTRACT:

This paper proposes “Electric Spring” (ES) based on Single Phase three-level Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter to achieve effective demand side management for stabilizing smart grid fed by substantial intermittent renewable energy sources (RES). Considering the most attractive features of multilevel inverter (MLI), an effective structure of Electric Spring is proposed for suppressing voltage fluctuation in power distribution network arising due to RES and maintaining the critical load voltage. Also, the operation of ES in capacitive as well as inductive mode is discussed. Further, the paper describes droop control method for parallel operation of distributed electric spring for stabilization the power grid. An exclusive dynamic performance of the system using electric spring has been tested and demonstrated through detailed MATLAB simulation.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Critical load
  2. Cascaded H-Bridge Inverter
  3. Droop control
  4. Electric Spring
  5. MLI
  6. RES
  7. Smart load

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Schematic of Electric Spring.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

Fig. 2. Observed RMS value of (a) Source voltage (Vs), (b) Non–critical voltage (Vnc), (c) Electric spring voltage (Va) & current (Ia), (d) Critical voltage (Vc) in capacitive mode.

Fig. 3. Observed Instantaneous value of (a) Source voltage (Vs), (b) Non–critical voltage (Vnc), (c) Electric spring voltage (Va) & current (Ia), (d) Critical voltage (Vc) in capacitive mode.

Fig. 4. Observed RMS value of (a) Source voltage (Vs), (b) Non–critical voltage (Vnc), (c) Electric spring voltage (Va) & current (Ia), (d) Critical voltage (Vc) in inductive mode.

Fig. 5. Observed Instantaneous value of (a) Source voltage (Vs), (b) Non– critical voltage (Vnc), (c) Electric spring voltage (Va) & current (Ia), (d) Critical voltage (Vc) in inductive mode.

Fig. 6. THD analysis of (a) Two-level and (b) Three-level CHMLI based ES.

CONCLUSION:

The paper proposes new approach for regulating the mains voltage using MLI based ES for smart grid applications. The implemented Three-level CHMLI based ES for smart grid application effectively regulates the ac mains voltage and reduces the THD content as compared with Two-level VSI based ES. The effectiveness of ES is validated through digital simulation in terms of THD. Lastly simulation results of droop control for Four Electric springs have been implemented in a large-scale distributed pattern in order to make multiple ES act in coordinating manner so as to have robust stabilizing effect.

REFERENCES:

[1] Edward J.Coster, Johanna M.A.Myrzik, BAS Kruimer, “Integration Issues of Distributed Generation Distribution Grids,” Proceedings of the IEEE, vol.99, no.1, pp.28-39, January, 2011.

[2] Koutsopoulos and L. Tassiulas, “Challenges in demand load control for the smart grid,” IEEE Netw., vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 16–21, 2011.

[3] M.H.J.Bollen, “Understanding Power Quality Problems: Voltage Sags and Interruptions,” IEEE Press, 2000.

[4] N. Hingorani and L. Gyugyi, Understanding FACTS, Concepts and Technology of Flexible AC Transmission Systems. New York: IEEE Press, 2000.

[5] M. Parvania and M. Fotuhi-Firuzabad, “Demand response scheduling by stochastic SCUC,” IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 89–98, Jun. 2010

A Synchronous Generator Based Diesel-PV Hybrid Micro-grid with Power Quality Controller

 

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents an isolated microgrid, with synchronous generator(SG) based diesel generation (DG) system in combination with solar photo-voltaic(PV). The DG supplies power to the load directly, and a battery supported voltage source converter (VSC) is connected in shunt at point of common coupling (PCC). The PV array is connected at DC-link of the VSC through a boost converter. A high order optimization based adaptive filter control scheme is used for maintaining the quality of PCC voltages and source currents. This controller makes the waveform free of distortion, removes errors due to unbalances, corrects the power factor and makes the source current smooth sinusoidal, irrespective of the nature of load. MATLAB/Simulink based simulation results demonstrate satisfactory performance of the given system.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Battery
  2. Diesel generator
  3. LMF
  4. Power quality
  5. PV

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

 

 

Fig. 1 System model

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Fig. 2 Steady State Response of DG-PV micro-grid

Fig. 3 Dynamic Response of DG-PV micro-grid

CONCLUSION:

An isolated SG based DG and PV hybrid micro-grid has been presented here, with a battery suppported VSC connected at PCC. Three-phase adaptive control is used for power quality improvement through VSC. The given system and control have been simulated in MATLAB/Simulink environment and results demonstrate their satisfactory performance in both steady state and dynamic conditions.

REFERENCES:

[1] G. Shafiullah et al., “Meeting energy demand and global warming by integrating renewable energy into the grid,” in 22nd Australasian Universities Power Engg. Conf. (AUPEC), pp. 1–7, Bali, 2012.

[2] M. Milligan et al., “Alternatives No More: Wind and Solar Power Are Mainstays of a Clean, Reliable, Affordable Grid,” IEEE Power & Energy Mag., vol. 13, no. 6, pp. 78–87, Nov.-Dec. 2015.

[3] L. Partain and L. Fraas, “Displacing California’s coal and nuclear generation with solar PV and wind by 2022 using vehicle-to-grid energy storage,” IEEE Photovoltaic Specialist Conf., pp. 1–6, LA, 2015.

[4] Daniel E. Olivares et al., “Trends in Microgrid Control,” in 2015 IEEE Trans. Smart Grid, vol. 5, no.4, pp. 1905–1919, July, 2014.

[5] Z. Zavody, “The grid challenges for renewable energy An overview and some priorities,” IET Seminar on Integrating Renewable Energy to the Grid, pp. 1–24, London 2014.

Real Time Control of an Active Power Filter under Distorted Voltage Condition

ABSTRACT:

This paper, presents three phase shunt active filter under distorted voltage condition, the active power filter control is based on the use of self-tuning filter (STF) for reference current generation and on space vector PWM for generation of pulses. The dc capacitor voltage is controlled by a classical PI controller. The diode rectifier feed RL load is taken as a nonlinear load. The self-tuning filter allows extracting directly the voltage and current fundamental components in the axis without phase locked loop (PLL) under distorted voltage condition. The experiment analysis is made based on working under distorted voltage condition, and the total harmonic distortion of source current after compensation .Self tuning filter based extraction technique is good under distorted voltage conditions. The total harmonic distortion (THD) of source current is fully reduced. The effectiveness of the method is theoretically studied and verified by experimentation.

KEYWORDS:

  1. active power filters
  2. dSPACE1104
  3. real time
  4. STF
  5. SVM

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

 

Figure 1. Active Power Filter

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 Figure 2. The source voltage

Figure 3. The load current

Figure 4. Source current

Figure 5. Filter current and its reference

Figure 6. The DC voltage

Figure 7. Load current’s harmonic spectrum

Figure 8. Source current’s harmonic spectrum

CONCLUSION:

A modified pq theory control technique applied to a three-phase Shunt Power Filter is proposed. The appropriate control strategy for removing harmonics caused by non-linear loads is developed. The main advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity (no PLL circuit needed) and its efficiency in non-ideal voltage condition. The use of SVPWM method allows to the inverter to fellow its reference accurately which increase the performance of the active filter. The experiment results show the efficiency of the proposed method in terms of harmonic reduction as shown in Figure12, the THD obtained by the new control technique has been drastically reduced.

REFERENCES:

[1] N. Mariun, A. Alam, S. Mahmod, and H. Hizam, “Review of control strategies for power quality conditioners”, in Power and Energy Conference, 2004. PECon 2004. Proceedings. National, 2004, pp. 109– 115.

[2] G. W. Chang and C. M. Yeh, “Optimisation-based strategy for shunt active power filter control under non-ideal supply voltages”, IEE Proceedings – Electric Power Applications, vol. 152, no. 2, p. 182, 2005.

[3] S. George and V. Agarwal, “A DSP Based Optimal Algorithm for Shunt Active Filter Under Nonsinusoidal Supply and Unbalanced Load Conditions”, Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 593 –601, Mar. 2007.

[4] M. I. M. Montero, E. R. Cadaval, and F. B. Gonzalez, “Comparison of Control Strategies for Shunt Active Power Filters in Three-Phase Four-Wire Systems”, Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 229 –236, Jan. 2007.

[5] M. Abdusalam, P. Poure, and S. Saadate, “Hardware implementation of a three-phase active filter system with harmonic isolation based on self-tuning-filter”, in IEEE Power Electronics Specialists  Conference, 2008. PESC 2008, 2008, pp. 2875–2881.,

Three-Phase Shunt Active Power Filter for Power Improvement Quality using Sliding Mode Controller

ABSTRACT:

In this paper, experimental study of Sliding Mode Controller (SMC) DC bus voltage of three phase shunt active power filter (APF), to improve power quality by compensating harmonics and reactive power required by nonlinear load is proposed. The algorithm used to identify the reference currents is based on the Self Tuning Filter (STF). For generation of the pulse switching of the IGBTs inverter the hysteresis current controller is used, implemented into an analogue card. Finally, various experimental results are presented under steady state and transient conditions.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Shunt Active Power Filter (APF)
  2. Total Harmonic Distortion (THD)
  3. Sliding Mode Controller (SMC)
  4. Self Tuning Filter (STF)

 SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

 

Fig. 1: The basic compensation principle of the shunt APF.

 EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

 

Fig. 2. Experimental APF results: load current iL (A), filter current iF (A)

and source current iS (A). Ch1 to Ch4 scale: 5 A/div. Time scale: 20 ms/div.

 

Fig. 3. Experimental APF results: load current iL (A), filter current iF (A),

source current iS (A) and source voltage Vs (V). Ch1 and Ch3 scale: 5 A/div;

Ch2 scale: 100 V/div;Ch4 scale: 80 V/div; Time scale: 10 ms/div.

Figure 4. Experimental APF results : load current iL(A), filter current iF(A) ,

source current iS(A) and DC voltage Vdc(V). Ch1,Ch3 and Ch4 scale: 10

A/div. Ch2 scale: 100 V/div. Time scale: 20 ms/div.

Figure 5. Experimental APF results: DC voltage Vdc (V) and DC reference

voltage V*dc (V). Ch1 and Ch2 scale: 100 V/div. Time scale: 1s/div

CONCLUSION:

The control of the shunt Active Power Filter was divided in three parts, the first one realized by the dSPACE system to generate the reference currents, the second one achieved by an analogue card for the switching pattern generation, implementing a hysteresis current controller and the third party use a sliding mode controller SMC. A SMC controlled shunt active power filter has been studied to improve the power quality by compensating both harmonics and reactive power requirement of the nonlinear load. The performance of the SMC controller has been developed in real time process and successfully tested in the laboratory The results of experiment study of APF control technique presented in this paper are found quite satisfactory to eliminate harmonics and reactive power components from utility current. The shunt APF presented in this paper for the compensation of harmonic current components in non-linear load was effective for harmonic isolation and keeping the utility supply line current sinusoidal. The validity of this technique was proved on the basis of experiment results. The APF is found effective to meet IEEE- 519-1992 standard recommendations on harmonics levels.

REFERENCES:

[1] Chaoui; J.P.Gaubert; F.Krim; G.Champenois, “PI Controlled Threephase Shunt Active Power Filter for Power Quality Improvement” A. “Electric Power Components and Systems, 1532-5016, Volume 35, Issue 12, 2007, Pages 1331 – 1344.

[2] D. Benatous, R. Abdessemed, “Digital voltage control of AC/DC PWM Converter with improved power factor and supply current ”, Journal of electric machines and power systems, Taylor and francis, 2000.

[3] G. A. Capolino, A. Golea, H. Henao, “Système de réduction des perturbations réseau pour commande vectorielle ”, Proc. Colloque SEE Perturbations Réciproques des Convertisseurs et des Réseaux, Nantes, 6 juillet 1992.

[4] M. Abdusalam, P. Poure and S. Saadate,’’ A New control scheme of hybrid active filter using Self-Tuning Filter,’’ POWERENG, International Conference on Power Engineering , Energy and Electrical Drives, Setubal Portugal,12-14 April (2007).

[5] M. Abdusalam, P. Poure and S. Saadate, « Study and experimental +6validation of harmonic isolation based on Self-Tuning-Filter for threephase active filter ». ISIE, IEEE International Symposium on Industrial Electronics, Cambridge, UK, (2008).