A Two Degrees of Freedom Resonant Control Scheme for Voltage Sag Compensation in Dynamic Voltage Restorers

 

 IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics, 2017

ABSTRACT:

This paper presents a two degrees of freedom (2DOF) control scheme for voltage compensation in a dynamic voltage restorer (DVR). It commences with the model of the DVR power circuit, which is the starting point for the control design procedure. The control scheme is based on a 2DOF structure implemented in a stationary reference frame (α−β), with two nested controllers used to obtain a pass-band behavior of the closed-loop transfer function, and is capable of achieving both a balanced and an unbalanced voltage sag compensation. The 2DOF control has certain advantages with regard to traditional control methods, such as the possibility of ensuring that all the poles of the closed-loop transfer function are chosen without the need for observers and reducing the number of variables to be measured. The use of the well-known double control- loop schemes which employ feedback current controllers to reduce the resonance of the plant is, therefore, unnecessary. A simple control methodology permits the dynamic behavior of the system to be controlled and completely defines the location of the poles. Furthermore, extensive simulations and experimental results obtained using a 5 kW DVR laboratory prototype show the good performance of the proposed control strategy.

 

KEYWORDS:

  1. Power Quality
  2. Dynamic Voltage Restorer (DVR)
  3. Control Design
  4. Resonant Controller
  5. Stationary Frame Controller
  6. Voltage Sag.

 

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Fig. 1. Power system with a DVR included.

 

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 

Figure 2. DVR simulation for a balanced voltage sag. (a) Line-to-neutral three-phase voltages at PCC, (b) line-to-neutral voltages generated by the DVR, (c) line-to-neutral load voltages, and (d) error signal in α − β (redblue).

Figure 3 DVR simulation for an unbalanced voltage sag. (a) Line-to-neutral three-phase voltages at PCC, (b) line-to-neutral voltages generated by the DVR, (c) line-to-neutral load voltages, and (d) error signal in α − β (redblue).

Figure 4. DVR simulation for a 30 % balanced voltage sag. (a) Line-to neutral three-phase voltages at PCC, (b) error signal in α − β (red-blue) for the 2DOF-Resonant scheme, (c) error signal in α − β (red-blue) for double loop scheme, and (d) error signal in α−β (red-blue) for the double-loop with Posicast scheme.

Figure 5. DVR simulation for a 30 % type-E unbalanced voltage sag. (a) Line-to-neutral three-phase voltages at PCC, (b) error signal in α − β (redblue) for the 2DOF-Resonant scheme, (c) error signal in α − β (red blue) for double-loop scheme, and (d) error signal in α − β (red-blue) for the double-loop with Posicast scheme.

 

 CONCLUSION:

This paper presents a control scheme based on two nested controllers for voltage sag compensation in a DVR. The nested regulators provide the control with two degrees of freedom, and the control scheme is implemented in the stationary reference frame. Furthermore, in order to accomplish the requirements for voltage sag compensation, it is necessary to track the component at the fundamental frequency. This is achieved using a resonant term in one of the controllers. The proposed control design methodology is able to define all the poles of the closed-loop system without observers and with a reduction in the number of variables that must be measured, thus making it possible to avoid the use of the traditional current loop employed in control schemes for the DVR. The structure with the nested regulators achieves perfect zero tracking error at the nominal frequency and blocks the DC offset, signifying that it has some advantages over other control methods, such as double-loop schemes with proportional-resonant regulators. Moreover, the design methodology is thoroughly explained when the delay in the calculations is taken into account.

In this case, the design procedure allows the dominant poles of the closed-loop system to be chosen. If the closed-loop poles are chosen carefully, this control structure can also be applied to other systems which require higher delays, e.g., power converter applications with a reduced switching frequency. The design methodology can additionally be extended to the discrete domain. Comprehensive simulated and experimental results corroborate the performance of the 2DOF-Resonant control scheme for balanced and unbalanced voltage sags. The proposed control scheme is able to compensate both types of voltage sags with a very fast transient response and an accurate tracking of the reference voltage, even when the different types of loads and frequency deviations of the grid voltages are considered. Extended comparisons with a PR controller using a double-loop scheme and a PR controller in a double loop with a Posicast regulator have been carried out, demonstrating that the performance of the 2DOF-Resonant controller is superior in all cases. Moreover, the study of the stability as regards parameter variations for the compared control schemes demonstrates the more robust behavior of the 2DOF-Resonant control scheme.

 

REFERENCES:

  • H. M. Quezada, J. R. Abbad, and T. G. S. Rom´an, “Assessment of energy distribution losses for increasing penetration of distributed generation,” IEEE Transactions on Power Systems, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 533–540, May 2006.
  • K. Jukan, A. Jukan, and A. Toki´c, “Identification and assessment of key risks and power quality issues in liberalized electricity markets in europe,” International Journal of Engineering & Technology, vol. 11, no. 03, pp. 20–26, 2011.
  • EN-50160, European Standard EN-50160. Voltage Characteristics of Public Distribution Systems, CENELEC Std., November 1999.
  • 1547, IEEE Std. 1547-2003. Standard for Interconnecting Distributed Resources with Electric Power Systems, IEEE Std., June 2003.
  • P. Mahela and A. G. Shaik, “Topological aspects of power quality improvement techniques: A comprehensive overview,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, vol. 58, pp. 1129–1142, May 2016.

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