Speed Control of Induction Motor Using New Sliding Mode Control Technique

ABSTRACT

Induction Motors have been used as the workhorse in the industry for a long time due to its easy build, high robustness, and generally satisfactory efficiency. However, they are significantly more difficult to control than DC motors. One of the problems which might cause unsuccessful attempts for designing a proper controller would be the time varying nature of parameters and variables which might be changed while working with the motion systems. One of the best suggested solutions to solve this problem would be the use of Sliding Mode Control (SMC). This paper presents the design of a new controller for a vector control induction motor drive that employs an outer loop speed controller using SMC. Several tests were performed to evaluate the performance of the new controller method, and two other sliding mode controller techniques. From the comparative simulation results, one can conclude that the new controller law provides high performance dynamic characteristics and is robust with regard to plant parameter variations.

 

KEYWORDS:

  1. Induction Motor
  2. Sliding Mode Control
  3. DC Motors
  4. PI Controller

 

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 

BLOCK DIAGRAM:

Induction motor drive system with sliding mode controller

Fig. 1 Induction motor drive system with sliding mode controller

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

                           Rotor speed tracking performance (b)Rotor speed tracking error (c)Control effort Rotor speed tracking performance (b)Rotor speed tracking error (c)Control effort Rotor speed tracking performance (b)Rotor speed tracking error (c)Control effort

Fig.2 (a)Rotor speed tracking performance  (b)Rotor speed tracking error   (c)Control effort

image005 image006 image007

Fig.3 (a)Rotor speed tracking performance  (b)Rotor speed tracking error   (c)Control effort

image008 image009 image010

Fig.4 (a)Rotor speed tracking performance  (b)Rotor speed tracking error   (c)Control effort

 

CONCLUSION

In this paper, new technique to reduced chattering for sliding mode control is submitted to design the rotor speed control of induction motor. To validate the performances of the new proposed control law, we provided a series of simulations and a comparative study between the performances of the new proposed sliding mode controller strategy and those of the Pseudo and Saturation sliding mode controller techniques. The sliding mode controller algorithms are capable of high precision rotor speed tracking. From the comparative simulation results, one can conclude that the three sliding mode controller techniques demonstrate nearly the same dynamic behavior under nominal condition. Also, from the simulation results, it can be seen obviously that the control performance of the new sliding mode controller strategy in the rotor speed tracking, robustness to parameter variations is superior to that of the other sliding mode controller techniques.

 

REFERENCES

  1. Wade, M.W.Dunnigan, B.W.Williams, X.Yu, ‘Position control of a vector controlled induction machine using slotine’s sliding mode control’, IEE Proceeding Electronics Power Application, Vol. 145, No.3, pp.231-238, 1998.
  2. I.Utkin, ‘Sliding mode control design principles and applications to electric drives’, IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics, Vol.40, No.1, pp. 23-36, February 1993.
  3. K.Namdam, P.C.Sen, ‘Accessible states based sliding mode control of a variable speed drive system’, IEEE Transactions Industry Application, Vol.30, August 1995, pp.373-381.
  4. Krishnan, ‘Electric motor drives: modelling, analysis, and control’, Prentice-Hall, New-Jersey, 2001.
  5. J.Wai, K.H.Su, C.Y.Tu, ‘Implementation of adaptive enhanced fuzzy sliding mode control for indirect field oriented induction motor drive’, IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems, pp.1440-1445, 2003.

 

Backstepping Control of Smart Grid-Connected Distributed Photovoltaic Power Supplies for Telecom Equipment

ABSTRACT:

Backstepping controllers are obtained for distributed hybrid photovoltaic (PV) power supplies of telecommunication equipment. Grid-connected PV-based power supply units may contain dc–dc buck–boost converters linked to single-phase inverters. This distributed energy resource operated within the self consumption concept can aid in the peak-shaving strategy of ac smart grids. New backstepping control laws are obtained for the single-phase inverter and for the buck–boost converter feeding a telecom equipment/battery while sourcing the PV excess power to the smart grid or to grid supply the telecom system. The backstepping approach is robust and able to cope with the grid nonlinearity and uncertainties providing dc input current and voltage controllers for the buck–boost converter to track the PV panel maximum power point, regulating the PV output dc voltage to extract maximum power; unity power factor sinusoidal ac smart grid inverter currents and constant dc-link voltages suited for telecom equipment; and inverter bidirectional power transfer. Experimental results are obtained from a lab setup controlled by one inexpensive dsPIC running the sampling, the backstepping and modulator algorithms. Results show the controllers guarantee maximum power transfer to the telecom equipment/ac grid, ensuring steady dc-link voltage while absorbing/injecting low harmonic distortion current into the smart grid.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Backstepping
  2. Buck–boost converter
  3. Dc/ac converter
  4. MPPT
  5. Self-consumption
  6. Smart grids

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 BLOCK DIAGRAM:

 image001

Fig. 1. PV distributed hybrid self-consumption system and telecom load.

EXPECTED SIMULATION RESULTS:

 image002

 Fig. 2. MPPT operation.

       image003

Fig. 3. Voltage and current waveforms when there is a change from inverter to rectifier.

image004

Fig. 4. (a)Voltage and current waveforms when there is a change from inverter to rectifier. (b) Center part zoom of (a).

image005

Fig. 5. Voltage and current waveforms when the load requires 25 W.

image006

Fig. 6. Voltage and current waveforms when the load requires 62 W.

image007

Fig. 7. DC–AC converter input power.

 CONCLUSION:

This paper proposes a novel backstepping controller for a PV panel feeding a buck–boost converter, and dc linked to a telecom load and a single-phase ac–dc converter connected to a smart grid, configuring a subset of a distributed hybrid photovoltaic power supply for telecom equipments within the self-consumption concept. This setup absorbs/injects nearly sinusoidal (THD = 1.6%, lower than the 3% required by the standards) grid currents at near unity power factor and the self consumption can contribute to the smart grid peak power shaving strategy.

New nonlinear backstepping control laws were obtained for the input voltage of the buck–boost converter, thus achieving MPP operation (MPPT efficiency between 98.2% and 99.9%) and for the dc–ac converter regulating the dc telecom load voltage and controlling the ac grid current. All the control laws, fixed frequency converter modulators, voltage and current sampling, and grid synchronization have been implemented using a low-cost dsPIC30F4011 microcontroller.

Obtained experimental results show the performance of the PV self-consumption system using the backstepping control method. Results show the system dynamic behavior when the dc–ac converter changes operation from inverter to rectifier to adapt itself to the telecom load requirements. The robustness of the control laws has been tested as well. Capacitance of real capacitors can vary almost ten times around the rated value, while inductances can vary from 30% to nearly 300% of the rated value.

 REFERENCES:

[1] N. Femia, G. Petrone, G. Spagnuolo, and M. Vitelli, Power Electronics and Control Techniques for Maximum Energy Harvesting in Photovoltaic Systems. Boca Raton, FL, USA: CRC Press, 2013.

[2] A.Maki and S. Valkealahti, “Effect of photovoltaic generator components on the number of MPPs under partial shading conditions,” IEEE Trans. Energy Convers., vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1008–1017, Dec. 2013.

[3] Epia Org. (2013, Jul.). Self-consumption of PV electricity—Position paper. [Online]. Available:http://www.epia.org/fileadmin/user_upload/Position_Papers/Self_and_direct_consumption_-_position_paper_-_final _version.pdf

[4] SunEdison. (2011, Nov.). Enabling the European consumer to generate power for self-consumption. [Online]. Available: http://www. sunedison.com/wps/wcm/connect/35bfb52a-ec27-4751-8670-fe6e807e8063/SunEdison_PV_Self  consumption_Study_high_resolution_%2813_ Mb%29.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

[5] A. Nourai, R. Sastry, and T.Walker, “A vision & strategy for deployment of energy storage in electric utilities,” in Proc. IEEE Power Energy Soc. Gen. Meeting, 2010, pp. 1–4.

2016/2017 IEEE Electrical Projects for BTech/MTech

2016 2017 IEEE Electrical Projects List-2015/2016/2017

Software Used: Matlab/Simulink

Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc

Download

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

Electrical engineers typically hold a degree in electrical engineering or electronic engineering. Practicing engineers may have professional certification and be members of a professional body. Such bodies include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (professional society) (IET).

Electrical engineers work in a very wide range of industries and the skills required are likewise variable. These range from basic circuit theory to the management skills required of a project manager. The tools and equipment that an individual engineer may need are similarly variable, ranging from a simple voltmeter to a top end analyzer to sophisticated design and manufacturing software.

Best Electrical Engineering Projects

Best Electrical Engineering Projects List-2015/2016/2017

Software Used: Matlab/Simulink

Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc

Download

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

Electrical engineers typically hold a degree in electrical engineering or electronic engineering. Practicing engineers may have professional certification and be members of a professional body. Such bodies include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (professional society) (IET).

Electrical engineers work in a very wide range of industries and the skills required are likewise variable. These range from basic circuit theory to the management skills required of a project manager. The tools and equipment that an individual engineer may need are similarly variable, ranging from a simple voltmeter to a top end analyzer to sophisticated design and manufacturing software.

Top IEEE Electrical Projects using Matlab/Simulink

Top IEEE Electrical Projects List-2015/2016/2017

Software Used: Matlab/Simulink

Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc

Download

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

Electrical engineers typically hold a degree in electrical engineering or electronic engineering. Practicing engineers may have professional certification and be members of a professional body. Such bodies include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (professional society) (IET).

Electrical engineers work in a very wide range of industries and the skills required are likewise variable. These range from basic circuit theory to the management skills required of a project manager. The tools and equipment that an individual engineer may need are similarly variable, ranging from a simple voltmeter to a top end analyzer to sophisticated design and manufacturing software.

Modular Multilevel DC/DC Converters with Phase Shift Control Scheme for High Voltage DC-Based Systems

ABSTRACT

In this paper, by investigating the topology derivation principle of the phase shift controlled three-level DC/DC converters, the modular multilevel DC/DC converters, by integrating the full-bridge converters and three-level flying-capacitor circuit, are proposed for the high step-down and high power DC-based systems. The high switch voltage stress in the primary side is effectively reduced by the full-bridge modules in series. Therefore, the low-voltage rated power devices can be employed to obtain the benefits of low conduction losses. More importantly, the voltage auto-balance ability among the cascaded modules is achieved by the inherent flying capacitor, which removes the additional possible active components or control loops. In additional, zero-voltage-switching (ZVS) performance for all the active switches can be provided due to the phase shift control scheme, which can reduce the switching losses. The circuit operation and converter performance are analyzed in detail. Finally, the performance of the presented converter is verified by the simulation results.

 

KEYWORDS

  1. Modular multilevel DC/DC converter
  2. Phase shift control scheme
  3. Input voltage auto-balance
  4. Zero voltage switching

 

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

 

CIRCUIT DIAGRAM:

Proposed modular multilevel DC/DC converter with input voltage auto-balance ability.

Fig.1. Proposed modular multilevel DC/DC converter with input voltage auto-balance ability.

 

SIMULATION RESULTS

image002 imulation waveforms: (a) Input voltage without flying capacitor and (b) Input voltage with flying capacitor.

Fig.2. Simulation waveforms: (a) Input voltage without flying capacitor and (b) Input voltage with flying capacitor.

Simulation result of primary voltage and current.

Fig.3. Simulation result of primary voltage and current.

Simulation result of ZVS operation: (a)ZVS operation for S11 and (b) ZVS operation for S14.

Fig.4. Simulation result of ZVS operation: (a)ZVS operation for S11 and (b) ZVS operation for S14.

image006

Fig.5. Simulation result of input voltage sharing.

Measured efficiency of proposed converter.

Fig.6. Measured efficiency of proposed converter.

CONCLUSION

In this paper, a novel phase shift controlled modular multilevel DC/DC converter is proposed and analyzed for the high input voltage DC-based systems. Due to the inherent flying capacitor, which connects the input divided capacitors alternatively, the input voltage is automatically shared and balanced without any additional power components and control loops. Consequently, the switch voltage stress is reduced and the circuit reliability is enhanced. By adopting the phase shift control scheme, ZVS soft switching performance is ensured to reduce the switching losses. The modular multilevel DC/DC converter concept can be easily extend to N-stage converter with stacked full-bridge modules to satisfy extremely high voltage applications with low voltage rated power switches.

 

REFERENCES

  1. Kakigano, Y. Miura and T. Ise, “Low-Voltage Bipolar-Type DC Microgrid for Super High Quality Distribution,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., Vol. 25, No. 12, pp. 3066-3075, Dec 2010.
  2. Anand and B. G. Fernandes, “Reduced-Order Model and Stability Analysis of Low-Voltage DC Microgrid,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Electron., vol. 60, No. 11, pp. 5040-5049, Nov 2013.
  3. Anand and B. G. Fernandes, “Optimal voltage level for DC microgrids,” IEEE Conf. Ind. Electron. (IECON), pp. 3034-3039, 2010.
  4. Salomonsson, L. Soder and A. Sannino, “An Adaptive Control System for a DC Microgrid for Data Centers,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., vol. 44, No. 6, pp. 1910-1917, Nov./Dec. 2008.
  5. B. Park, G. W. Moon and M. J. Youn, “Series-Input Series-Rectifier Interleaved Forward Converter With a Common Transformer Reset Circuit for High-Input-Voltage Applications,” IEEE Trans. Power Electron., vol. 26, No. 11, pp. 3242-3253, Nov 2011.Modular Multilevel DC/DC Converters with Phase Shift Control Scheme for High Voltage DC-Based Systems

CONTROL OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC) SYSTEMS IN STAND-ALONE AND GRID CONNECTED MODES

ABSTRACT

As energy consumption rises, one must find suitable alternative means of generation to supplement conventional existing generation facilities. In this regard, distributed generation (DG) will continue to play a critical role in the energy supply demand realm. The common technologies available as DG are micro-turbines, solar, photovoltaic systems, fuel cells stack and wind energy systems. In this project, dynamic model of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is done. Fuel cells operate at low voltages and hence fuel cells need to be boosted and inverted in order to connect to the utility grid. A DC-DC converter and a DC-AC inverter were used for interfacing SOFC with the grid. These models are built in MATLAB/SIMULINK. The power characteristics of the fuel cell, DC-DC converter, DC-AC inverter are plotted for reference real power of 50kW for standalone applications. The power characteristics of the DC-AC inverter are plotted for 30kW, 50kW, 70kW of load and also for step change in load for grid connected applications.

KEYWORDS:

  1. Distributed Generation
  2. DC-DC Converter
  3. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)

SOFTWARE: MATLAB/SIMULINK

SIMULATION MODEL:

image001

Figure 1 Simulation model for GRID connected applications

SIMULATION RESULTS

image002

Figure 2. Power response for 50kW of load

image003

Figure 3. Current response for 50kW of load

image004

Figure 4. Power response for 50kW of load

image005

Figure 5. Current response for 30kW of load

image006

Figure 6. Power response for 70kW of load

image007

Figure 7. Current response for 70kW of load

image008

Figure 8. Response of power for step change in load

image009

Figure 9. Response of current for step change in load

image010

Figure 10. Response of power flow during faults in load

image011

Figure 11. Response of current flow during faults in load

image012

Figure 12. Response of Reactive Power Flow of 200 VAR

image013

Figure 13. Response of Reactive power Flow for step change

CONCLUSION

A dynamic model of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) was developed in this project in MATLAB environment setup.

A DC-DC boost converter topology and its closed loop control feedback system have been built. A three phase inverter has been modeled and connected between the SOFC-DC-DC system on the one side and the utility grid on the other side. A control strategy for the inverter switching signals has been discussed and modeled successfully.

The fuel cell, the converter and the inverter characteristics were obtained for a reference real power of 50kW.The slow response of the fuel cell is due to the slow and gradual change in the fuel flow which is proportional to the stack current. The interconnection of the fuel cell with the converter boosts the stack voltages and also regulates it for varying load current conditions. The fuel cell stack voltage drops to zero for discontinuous current and the system shuts down. The fuel cell unit shuts off for real power above the maximum limit. Additional power at the converter is provided by the inductor, connected in series with the equivalent load which acts as an energy storage. The inductor can be replaced by any energy storage device such as a capacitor or a battery for providing additional power during load transients.

The inverter control scheme uses a constant power control strategy for grid connected applications and a constant voltage control strategy for standalone applications to control the voltage across inverter and current flowing through the load. The characteristics for the system have been obtained. The inverter voltage, current, power waveform have been plotted. The real power injection into the grid takes less than 0.1s to reach the commanded value of 50kW. The reactive power injection has been assumed to be zero and was evident from the simulation results. The maximum power limit on the fuel cell is 400kW. For any reference power beyond this limit, the fuel cell loses stability and drops to zero. This limit has been set by the parameters considered for the fuel cell data. Higher power can be commanded by either increasing the number of the cells, increasing the reversible standard potential or by decreasing the fuel cell resistance.

The system was then subjected to a step change in the reference real power from 40 to 80kW.The fuel cell, the converter and the inverter responses were obtained. The characteristics of the fuel cell (voltage, current and power) have a slower gradual change at the instant of step change. The DC link voltage was maintained at the reference value by the closed loop control system. Step change in the reference power from 40 to 80kW has been considered in order to observe the sharing of power from inverter to grid and from grid to the load of the fuel cell. The reactive power was zero until the step change and after the step change, oscillations were observed in the reactive power as well. Voltage, current, power characteristics of inverter, load and grid as been plotted for various conditions of load.

 REFERENCES

  1. Padulles, G. W. Ault, and J. R. McDonald, “An Approach to the Dynamic Modeling of Fuel Cell Characteristics for Distributed Generation Operation,” IEEE- PES Winter Meeting, vol. 1, Issue 1, pp. 134-138, January 2000.
  2. Pasricha, and S. R. Shaw, “A Dynamic PEM Fuel Cell Model,” IEEE Trans. Energy Conversion, vol. 21, Issue 2, pp. 484-490, June 2006.
  3. R. Pathapati, X. Xue, and J. Tang, “A New Dynamic Model for Predicting Transient Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell System,” Renewable Energy, vol. 30, Issue 1, pp. 1-22, January 2005.
  4. Wang, and M. H. Nehrir, “Dynamic Models and Model Validation for a PEM Fuel Cells Using Electrical Circuits,” IEEE Trans. Energy Conversion, vol. 20, Issue 2, pp. 442-451, June 2005.
  5. J. Hall, and R. G. Colclaser, “Transient Modeling and Simulation of a Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell,” IEEE Trans. Energy Conversion, vol. 14, Issue 3, pp.749-753, September1999.

Final year IEEE Projects-Power Electronics, Power Systems using Matlab/Simulink Software

Final year IEEE Projects List-2015/2016/2017

For BTech and MTech Final Year Academic Projects

Software Used: Matlab/Simulink

Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc

Download

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

Electrical engineers typically hold a degree in electrical engineering or electronic engineering. Practicing engineers may have professional certification and be members of a professional body. Such bodies include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (professional society) (IET).

Electrical engineers work in a very wide range of industries and the skills required are likewise variable. These range from basic circuit theory to the management skills required of a project manager. The tools and equipment that an individual engineer may need are similarly variable, ranging from a simple voltmeter to a top end analyzer to sophisticated design and manufacturing software.

Best IEEE EEE Projects for Final Year BTech using Matlab/Simulink Software

Best IEEE EEE Projects List-2015/2016/2017

For BTech and MTech Final Year Academic Projects

Software Used: Matlab/Simulink

Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc

Download

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

Electrical engineers typically hold a degree in electrical engineering or electronic engineering. Practicing engineers may have professional certification and be members of a professional body. Such bodies include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (professional society) (IET).

Electrical engineers work in a very wide range of industries and the skills required are likewise variable. These range from basic circuit theory to the management skills required of a project manager. The tools and equipment that an individual engineer may need are similarly variable, ranging from a simple voltmeter to a top end analyzer to sophisticated design and manufacturing software.

IEEE Electrical Academic Projects for BTech and MTech using Matlab/Simulink-Amravati, Maharashtra

Latest IEEE Electrical Academic Projects List-2015/2016/2017

For BTech and MTech Final year

Software Used: Matlab/Simulink

Areas : Power Electronics and Drives, Power Systems, Renewable Energy and sources, etc

Download

Electrical engineering is a field of engineering that generally deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics, and electro magnetism. This field first became an identifiable occupation in the later half of the 19th century after commercialization of the electric telegraph, the telephone, and electric power distribution and use. Subsequently, broad casting and recording media made electronics part of daily life. The invention of the transistor, and later the integrated circuit, brought down the cost of electronics to the point they can be used in almost any household object.

Electrical engineering has now subdivided into a wide range of sub fields including electronics, digital computers, power engineering, tele communications, control systems, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and microelectronics. Many of these sub disciplines overlap and also overlap with other engineering branches, spanning a huge number of specializations such as hardware engineering, power electronics, electro magnetics & waves, microwave engineering, nanotechnology, electro chemistry, renewable energies, mechatronics, electrical materials science, and many more.

Electrical engineers typically hold a degree in electrical engineering or electronic engineering. Practicing engineers may have professional certification and be members of a professional body. Such bodies include the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (professional society) (IET).

Electrical engineers work in a very wide range of industries and the skills required are likewise variable. These range from basic circuit theory to the management skills required of a project manager. The tools and equipment that an individual engineer may need are similarly variable, ranging from a simple voltmeter to a top end analyzer to sophisticated design and manufacturing software.

IEEE electrical academic projects

IEEE Electrical academic projects